Woodalls Open Roads Forum: Class C Motorhomes: Changing a class C tire
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > Changing a class C tire

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next
mobilefleet

on the road

Senior Member

Joined: 10/09/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/22/10 07:06pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

crawford wrote:

I don't care what any buddy says weather or no to change a tire you should carry one anyway wait till the day they can't find one while you are on a trip on the road ,My friend did this he was there 3 days and the price of the tire was 400.00 dollars he now carrys a spare.


where was your friend that he had to wait 3 days? was it on a holiday weekend?

crawford

Dandridge Tenn.

Senior Member

Joined: 03/22/2006

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 06/22/10 07:22pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ii was a 3 day holiday with a od size tire but would you like to even sit 1 day and get gorged with the price when they got you they got you good.





pnichols

Santa Cruz Mountains

Senior Member

Joined: 04/26/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 06/22/10 09:16pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

Quote:

At 60 years old and after 2 heart attacks I'll wait for assistance


The "60 years years old and after 2 heart attacks" part is COMPLETELY understandable and a very wise consideration.

HOWEVER the "I'll wait for assistance" part is definitely a calculated risk ... at least with respect to Class B and most Class C motorhomes' tires being changed by somebody else when you're caught way out some place.

What if assistance can't be contacted or vehicles aren't passing by? Cell phones can't always get out. In the last two years this has happened twice to folks we were traveling with in their small (only 24 foot) Class C motorhomes:

- Two years ago on a remote (but still paved) highway outside of Death Valley. At least three cell phones between our three Class C motorhomes, but only ONE phone could barely get out to call AAA to pull one of us from being badly stuck in soft shoulder situation. I tried to pull him out with a 30,000 lb. tow strap I carry, but couldn't exert enough force without everyone getting nervous over it so I quit.

- Last year on Route 66 of all places, the same thing happened to another traveling companion in their 24 foot Class C. I offered to try and pull him out with the same 30,000 lb. tow strap, but he refused thinking it wouldn't work. Only one cell phone could out to call AAA.

Now I carry a cell phone amplifier and roof antenna that greatly increases the range of any cell phone that can be placed near it's pickup sensor. I also replaced the nylon tow strap with a 20 foot case hardened CHP approved tow chain.

Regarding a bottle jack to change your own tire if your cell phone can't get out. A 20 ton jack is not required, 10 or 12 ton is fine. What is more important is A) your bottle jack is a long shaft model that extends higher than the standard length available in automotive parts stores, and B) that you have plenty of boards/blocks along to put under the jack's base so that it's base doesn't sink down into the ground.

The multiple wooden leveling blocks I carry along would be perfect to put under a jack base - or to put in a stuck rut so as to provide a ramp for the tires to climb up and out.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca 324V Spirit

crawford

Dandridge Tenn.

Senior Member

Joined: 03/22/2006

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 06/22/10 07:24pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

By the way Don the kit you show works if it's a small hole then a spare is the best.

mlh

Walker, Louisiana

Senior Member

Joined: 12/07/2006

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 06/22/10 10:13pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for all the tips guys. I am only 36 years old and no health issues, so physically changing the tire isn't the issue. The finance guy saying I wouldn't be able to change it just got me wondering if there was something I was missing. Anyway, the spare was included with the RV, I picked up a 10 ton bottle jack this afternoon from Harbor Freight. It ranges from about 7-3/4 inches to over 15, so I think it will be OK. I looked into getting a smaller one for the front, in case it was too low when completely flat. They all had the same minimum clearance, so I didn't buy it. Worst case, I could drive the flat tire up onto some blocks, then get the jack under it. I will try to remove a tire in the driveway though, just to make sure there are no hiccups. As far as ERS goes, like I said, I am glad I have it for a backup. Will I call them to change a tire...depends on the situation I guess. I'll cross that bridge when I come to it, but want my ducks in a row when I have to decide whether or not to cross it. As far as being on unstable / unlevel ground with cars passing 70 mph two feet away...I would not even change a car tire in those situations. I would pull to a safe level spot first. Back when I was a teenager, I changed a flat on a Ford Ranger. As soon as I got the spare tire on the studs, the truck shifted and the jack fell with the truck landing on the spare tire. I had not even gotten any lug nuts on it yet. I was very lucky. From then on, I never took chances like that again.


2010 Sunseeker 3170DS
2014 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited
Roadmaster Falcon 2 tow bar

Normk

Canada's Wet Coast

Senior Member

Joined: 01/24/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/22/10 11:08pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Make sure that the tire shop/mechanical shop oils the threads on the wheel studs and uses a torque wrench to tighten the wheel nuts. Recheck the wheel nuts after a 100 miles with your own torque wrench- you do have a torque wrench?

If the shop tries to tell you that they can correctly tighten the nuts by using an air impact without a torque stick, tell them that you will be taking the rig elsewhere because they will likely use other poor practices. But you likely already know that. I have had the opportunity to monitor several dozen experienced techs using feel to tighten fasteners.......

We carry a selection of 2x8" blocks for levelling and these make great pads for a 10 ton hydraulic bottle jack. Either have someone sit with their foot on the brake or buy/make a brake pedal depressor to hold the service brakes on while changing the tire. More than a few people have been squashed while jacking the rear wheel because the park has no effect when one rear wheel is liften. Even the holding power of the parking brake may not be sufficient when only one wheel is on the ground.

I use some blocks to jam the other three tires.

Changed many motor home and tool truck tires on the road over the years. No big deal if you know tools and are of reasonable strength. The advice to do it on the driveway for the first time is pure gold.

HIH

Norm

JAXFL

Jacksonville, Florida, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 06/12/2002

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 06/23/10 05:09am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ron.dittmer – wrote:
Good Point! People who cannot handle a tire due to pre-existing conditions and/or age, should leave it to someone else. That someone else may be a good Samariton. So why not have the proper & safe tools for him? It doesn't cost much for a bottle jack and 3' of gas pipe and a couple blocks. They take very little storage space in your RV.

It is common sense to pull off to a "Safe" location to change a tire on flat stable ground. Any emergency roadside assitant would ask you to do it for him just the same. Quite often flat tires are slow leaks, discovered during inspection or in the morning where you are parked safe.

Response:
I agree to have the spare and jack and wrench. HOWEVER, to pull off to a safe place in not always possible. This last weekend I was on Hwy 24 in Florida and for 13 miles there was only soft shoulder about 4 foot wide then ditch 3 foot deep and 1 lane each way. No safe place.

pnichols – wrote:
HOWEVER the "I'll wait for assistance" part is definitely a calculated risk ... at least with respect to Class B and most Class C motorhomes' tires being changed by somebody else when you're caught way out some place…..but only ONE phone could barely get out to call AAA.

Response:
That is what the toad is for. If you have no way to contact the outside world, unhook the toad and drive to find civilization.

Dakzuki

Carnation, Wa, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 11/01/2002

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 06/23/10 03:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Normk wrote:

Make sure that the tire shop/mechanical shop oils the threads on the wheel studs and uses a torque wrench to tighten the wheel nuts. Recheck the wheel nuts after a 100 miles with your own torque wrench- you do have a torque wrench?



HIH

Norm


My Ford manuals say use no lubricant.


2011 Itasca Navion 24J
2000 Chev Tracker Toad


Dakzuki

Carnation, Wa, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 11/01/2002

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 06/23/10 03:00pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JAXFL wrote:

OK not to start anything but... Of those that said change it yourself.... how many have tried to change it with out any help even in your own drive way? I mean I have changed TT tires and car tires but a MH tire is alot bigger and heaver and your on the side of the road with the flat on soft dirt, or the other side of the MH with traffic just missing you in 100 degrees weather..now try it...At 60 years old and after 2 heart attacks I'll wait for assistance, thanks.


I do it alone at home. I have even done it on the side of the freeway....in summer heat (years ago).

Even if you have ERS you would be wise to have the tools aboard to change and inflate tires. You never know what they might not have with them.

mutts2300

harrison

New Member

Joined: 03/08/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/23/10 02:03pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Having had to change an inside dual on I-75 south about 20 miles before the Tennessee state line at midnight ,here are my thoughts ...if you are going to change the tire yourself have 2 jacks , one to lift under axle to change tire and one to place under frame to prevent camper from swaying as trucks go by......your heart will thank you , also have large hammer on board , if wheel hasn't been off for awhile you will need to beat on the tire to get it off

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > Changing a class C tire
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 Woodalls | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS