Woodalls Open Roads Forum: Portable Heaters for a 25 foot travel trailer?
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in General RVing Issues

Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Portable Heaters for a 25 foot travel trailer?

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Next
curt12914

Northern NY State

Senior Member

Joined: 03/15/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/24/10 03:41pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TXiceman wrote:

sharker6 wrote:

The only electric that actually works to heat the complete TT and also puts out the most heat are the oil filled radiator heaters.


Bare element, ceramic or oil filled...a 1500 watt heater will only put out 1500 watts of hear. It makes no difference as to the type heater. Also, all 1500 watt heaters draw the same amperage.

Ken


I always though the same thing; 1500 watts is 1500 watts.

I thought that until I witnessed a debate between a dealer selling one of these new (very expensive) heaters that uses electric lights to heat. According to the guy who professed to be an electrical engineer, he claims that the (very expensive) heaters that use light bulbs are not as efficient as an inexpensive heater using a regular heating element.

He claims that since some of the electrical energy is used to make light, it is slightly less efficient than a heating element, which is virtually a dead short circuit.

The dealer was trying to say that the (very expensive) electric heater was more than 100% efficient, because the heat exchanger was hot when the lights went out and the fan was still blowing hot air (basically cooling the heat exchanger). The engineer pointed out that the heater was always operating at the same efficiency, but part of the time was spent warming the heat exchanger, so basically it was less than 100% efficient during warmup (which I would expect is the same principle as an oil filled heater).

He went on to say that since the heater had a circulating fan, it was less than 100% efficient.

Enough rambling. The OP has said he was interested in a heater for dry camping, so electric is really not an option for him anyway.


05 Ford F-350 Lariat CC 4X4 PSD DRW Line X Retrax
02 Montana Big Sky 3295 RK (2) Honda EU2000is
When my grown kids were inspecting our new fifth wheel, one asked why we bought a trailer that sleeps 4. My reply was that we couldn't find one that sleeps 2!

schlep1967

Harrisburg, PA

Senior Member

Joined: 12/08/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 08/24/10 01:16pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you use any heater inside your RV or home that consumes(burns) fuel you need at least one CO2 detector inside the RV/home. Preferable one near the heater and one near each sleeping area. I use the furnace and or electric heaters. I would not use a propane heater inside an RV. These things burn way to fast. And in most cases the children are at one end and the adults at the other. Putting a fire source in between does not seem like a wonderful idea.


2008 Dodge Ram 2500 Diesel
2009 Open Range 385RLS
Pull-Rite Super Glide

BillyW

North ID

Senior Member

Joined: 10/08/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/24/10 10:14am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have the Big Buddy and the regular Buddy heaters. Either one of them should be plenty to keep you warm. They work well, and the low oxygen shut-off works too well sometimes. Follow the directions and they should do the trick nicely. I don't sleep with one of them on, but first thing in the morning fire it up. Because my trailer is pretty small, I've found that I almost always keep some kind of ventilation open anyhow, even in icy conditions. Otherwise the condensation is an issue. In fact, since I've added the lexan windows to my screen door, I can leave the door open pretty much all day with the bathroom vent cracked. The Buddy heater keeps it nice and toasty. Last year I discovered the joys of refilling my 1 lb propane canisters. That's all I use with either of the Buddys. I learned the hard way that you should use a filter if you choose to connect your Buddy heater directly to a larger tank via a hose. The cost of replacement parts is prohibitive.

* This post was edited 08/24/10 10:21am by BillyW *



'97 F150 4X4
'04 Pioneer 18T6



Katdaddy

Petal, MS USA

Senior Member

Joined: 08/25/2003

View Profile



Posted: 08/24/10 08:56am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We use the Big Buddy heater when dry camping. I crack the rear window and the vent over the bed for cross ventilation. This is in temps above freezing, so pipes and plumbing are not an issue. We don't dry camp when it could get below freezing. The heater keeps our 28 footer comfortable. So far it has not killed me. If you allow for proper ventilation you should be just fine.


Little by little, one travels far - J.R.R. Tolkien
There ain't no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them. - Mark Twain

slarsen

Indiana

Senior Member

Joined: 11/11/2009

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/24/10 06:39am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TX is exactly correct. I get a kick out of the advertising on the boxes, suggesting one or another "is the most efficient heater you can buy" . . . just like every other 1500 watt heater.

OTOH, you might find one kind of heater more comfortable than another for your tastes; like an oil-filled heater might well give off more even and consistent heat. Or a radiant heater might seem to warm you really fast. Etc.

javaseuf

California's Gold Coast

Senior Member

Joined: 03/30/2005

View Profile



Posted: 08/17/10 08:49pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote from one of the OP's replies on the first page:

"Thanks for the input. Really looking for a second heater more for those occasions when dry camping, to save battery power".



Just a friendly suggestion.....
It really helps to read through the entire thread before offering advice not relevant to the thread. OP wants a heater for boondocking.

* This post was edited 08/17/10 10:44pm by javaseuf *





otisroy

Las Cruces, NM

Full Member

Joined: 08/15/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/17/10 09:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DrBaker wrote:

If I increase the amount of cold weather camping I do, I'll probably get one of the electric heaters because one of my dogs is slightly spooked by the trailer's furnace. He won't walk past it while it's running. When it kicks on, he is stuck on which ever side of it that he's on until it turns off.


I'm slightly spooked by the trailer's furnace too! They sound like the space shuttle spooling up for launch. We've used ceramic heaters when we've camped in cool weather. This winter we may camp in cold weather with the new trailer. I may have to get used to waking up to hearing the shuttle preparing for launch.

-Chris


2011 Keystone Laredo 291TG
2005 Chevy 2500HD
1971 Kaiser-Jeep M109A3
1971 AM General M35A2
Subaru RG3200iS


slarsen

Indiana

Senior Member

Joined: 11/11/2009

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/23/10 08:51pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I understand that boondocking is your interest. Keep in mind that a gas heater in the trailer produces a great deal of moisture. This can be a mold/health issue. Just wait: around Dec/Jan people will be posting, wondering why moisture is beading up everywhere in their RV, and they won't want to hear that it is their portable heater that is doing it. The RV furnace heater doesn't have this issue as it is vented outside.

I don't boondock, and I use two 1500 watt elec. heaters. The furnace never comes on.

PackerBacker

Montreal (Qc) Adirondacks (NY) Myrtle Beach (SC)

Moderator

Joined: 08/22/2002

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 08/24/10 06:09am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use a Lasko ceramic tower heater; two speeds 900 watts & 1500 watts. I had it in our 5th wheel and still use it in our MH even though we have two thermopumps. Nice and quiet and easy to store.


Eric
2009 Holiday Rambler Admiral 33SFS (34' 3")
2014 Enterra 314RES (Cruiser RV) TT, Honda 2000 Genny
2014 Ram 1500 Quad Short Bed, 5.7L Hemi, 8 speed auto, 4x4, Line-X
FQCC/Camping Quebec, KOA, Good Sam

TXiceman

Full Time RVer

Senior Member

Joined: 11/17/2000

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/24/10 06:26am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

sharker6 wrote:

The only electric that actually works to heat the complete TT and also puts out the most heat are the oil filled radiator heaters.


Bare element, ceramic or oil filled...a 1500 watt heater will only put out 1500 watts of hear. It makes no difference as to the type heater. Also, all 1500 watt heaters draw the same amperage.

Ken


Amateur Radio Operator.
2012 Cameo 37RSQ, toted with a 2012, F350, 6.7L PSD, Crewcab, dually. 3.73 axle, Full Time RVer.
Travel with a miniature schnauzer, a standard schnauzer and a Timneh African Gray parrot

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Portable Heaters for a 25 foot travel trailer?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in General RVing Issues


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 Woodalls | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS