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RE: Friends from the "OOP'S" thread.

Cloudy and 48. I don't think I will be doing much outside work today. I tried to get the lawn tractor out of the shop yesterday, and discovered that the ground grew up again, and I couldn't get the swinging doors open! i had to get the pick/mattock and peel a couple inches of dirt and grass off where the door swings so it would move! THAT little bit of real work about did me in! I may be getting too old and out of shape for that kind of stuff!
mowermech 04/23/14 10:53am Around the Campfire
RE: Who Double Tows With Your Motorhome

so TVTUTU ? That works!
mowermech 04/23/14 10:47am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Overweight Toad?

Well, so far I haven't seen any one say they're a structural steel engineer or something related to designing steel frames for trucks or MHs, or did I miss it someplace? If one pops up, my question would be "how do they determine the weight capacity that they post"? My guess would be they assign a weight that is very, very safe/conservative because they have no idea what people are actually going to do with the hitch. It's the mfg or engineering firm that stands a lot more of a chance at being sued if one fails. Bill I saw a comic strip (Calvin and Hobbes, IIRC) where the kid asked his dad how they determined the weight capacity of a bridge. The dad answered that they build the bridge, then run heavier and heavier trucks across it until it breaks, then they rebuild it and assign the weight limit. That makes as much sense as some of the stuff on here...
mowermech 04/23/14 06:36am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Who Double Tows With Your Motorhome

2 trailers is doubles, 3 trailers is triples and anything above that is considered a train. See MCA 61-10-104 Montana avoids the double/triple argument very neatly. The only time the word "double" is mentioned is the definition of "Rocky Mountain doubles" in Para. (5)(e). rocky Mountain double is a truck tractor/long trailer/short trailer. If you can't agree on what the correct terminology is, just don't use it! Sure, "tow vehicle/trailer/trailer" is awkward, but there is NO doubt about what is meant. Unless, of course, you want to get picky about the legal definition of "trailer"! In that case, you would have to say "tow vehicle/towed unit/towed unit". Ah, well, whatever floats yer boat.
mowermech 04/23/14 06:28am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Friends from the "OOP'S" thread.

Golly/gosh, it is empty and echoing in here...
mowermech 04/22/14 07:04am Around the Campfire
RE: Load Range D or E

As for whether a rim can handle the 80 PSI of a E load range tire, the best way to check is to look inside the rim or check the manufacturer's specs. However, here's something I noticed: 65 psi rims have 5 lugs; 80 psi rims have 6 lugs. Maybe there are exceptions to this but I have yet to find one. The rims on my old Dodge 1 ton dually had 8 lugs. The truck came from the factory with Load Range D tires. I installed Load Range E tires, one size larger than the data plate called for. Oddly enough, the larger tires corrected the speedometer error! I have no idea what the pressure rating of the rims was. In the past, I owned several old Chevy 6 lug trucks and cars. I really doubt if those rims were rated for 80 PSI!
mowermech 04/21/14 09:12pm Towing
RE: Who Double Tows With Your Motorhome

Here's a research subject for you Mowermech, that section you posted includes almost identical language to California law, "(4) A passenger vehicle or truck of less than 2,000 pounds "manufacturer's rated capacity" may not tow more than one trailer or semitrailer, and this combination may not have a length in excess of 65 feet." That is exactly what California says except that in California the truck must be 4,000 pounds unladen weight. The difference being in California a motorhome is defined as a passenger vehicle, whereas in Montana they appear to define Motorhome as a recreational vehicle, however, I can't find a definition in the vehicle code for "Passenger Vehicle." Have you seen a definition of Passenger Vehicle that would exclude a motorhome? All legal definitions pertaining to motor vehicles can be found in MCA 61-1-101. The definition of "motorhome" is in Para. (44) Other paragraphs of interest are (3), (5)(a), (31), (45)(a), (46)(a), (60), (85), (89), and (90)(a). Whoops, I missed (82) and (84)! It is, of course, interesting to read the entire section. It is quite enlightening! I looked through most of those earlier and did not see a definition for passenger vehicle. Is it in there someplace? No, the exact words "passenger vehicle" are not there. What you see is what there is. doing a search of the MCA database reveals that "passenger motor vehicle" is only used in the section referring to the issuance of personalized license plates, and then apparently only once. I guess the Montana legislature has never found it necessary to define a "passenger vehicle".
mowermech 04/21/14 09:03pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Loud Pickups

Isn't it funny how this just becomes annoying as you get older? And to think, I thought it was really cool 30 years ago. We recently bought the truck in my sig. It has a straight through muffler on it. I almost didn't buy because of that. After a month I'm still on the fence about whether I want to change it out or not. I know the feeling... My "new" truck (see sig) is so QUIET! I am tempted to have duals with glaspaks installed. But, the QUIET is rather nice, in a way... But, I miss that Dodge V8 rumble! Decisions, decisions...
mowermech 04/21/14 02:55pm RV Lifestyle
RE: Who Double Tows With Your Motorhome

Here's a research subject for you Mowermech, that section you posted includes almost identical language to California law, "(4) A passenger vehicle or truck of less than 2,000 pounds "manufacturer's rated capacity" may not tow more than one trailer or semitrailer, and this combination may not have a length in excess of 65 feet." That is exactly what California says except that in California the truck must be 4,000 pounds unladen weight. The difference being in California a motorhome is defined as a passenger vehicle, whereas in Montana they appear to define Motorhome as a recreational vehicle, however, I can't find a definition in the vehicle code for "Passenger Vehicle." Have you seen a definition of Passenger Vehicle that would exclude a motorhome? All legal definitions pertaining to motor vehicles can be found in MCA 61-1-101. The definition of "motorhome" is in Para. (44) Other paragraphs of interest are (3), (5)(a), (31), (45)(a), (46)(a), (60), (85), (89), and (90)(a). Whoops, I missed (82) and (84)! It is, of course, interesting to read the entire section. It is quite enlightening!
mowermech 04/21/14 02:46pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Who Double Tows With Your Motorhome

In Montana the OP would be legal. The length limit for a three vehicle combination is 75 feet. (note that I did not say anything about "trailers") No special license is required for RV double towing. The middle unit does not have to be a fifth wheel hitch. See MCA 61-10-104. You must be able to stop within 40 feet from 20 MPH on a level, clean, hard surface. See MCA 61-9-312.
mowermech 04/21/14 09:47am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Overweight Toad?

As always, I can only relate personal experience with "the numbers". the truck: 1994 dodge Ram CTD 3500 dually. the GCWR of the truck, according to the Owners Manual: 18,000 lbs. the Trailer: 1999 Monaco McKenzie 32 foot triple slide fifth wheel. Full time living. the scale weights: UNDER GAWR, all axles. UNDER GVWR, truck and trailer. OVER truck GCWR by 3,180 lbs. It crossed the Continental Divide several times, crossed the Sierras a couple of times, and the Cascades a cou0ple of times. Nothing bent, nothing broke, there were no accidents, nobody was injured or died. The Motorhome: 1995 Tioga 29 ft. on an E350 chassis, 460 V8, 3500 lb. hitch The toad: 2006 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited, mildly modified, weight unknown, on a fixed arm adjustable width 5000 lb. capacity tow bar. A well-qualified local welder reinforced the hitch. The Jeep was towed "over the mountains and through the woods" several times. Again, nothing bent, nothing broke, etc. If you look at nearly anything, you will find at least two "ratings"; the working rating, and the failure rating. Chain, cable, steel bars, bolts, plumbing, hydraulic hoses, etc. ALL have both a working load and a failure load. When it comes to vehicles, the manufacturer will never give out the failure load of any part. That lack is probably quite justifiable! The fact remains, the stated working rating is carefully determined to be that load at which the chances of failure are statistically insignificant, in order to minimize the liability of the manufacturer. the actual failure load can be 50 to 100% higher than the stated working load. The user will never know, unless he breaks it. So, do I recommend that the working loads should be regularly exceeded? No, of course not. Do I think that paranoia exists when it comes to ratings? Yes, based on a lifetime of experiences hauling and towing, I think it does. The continuing threats of legal action are quite humorous, however, considering the likelihood of ever seeing the threatener, and the even smaller likelihood of being in an accident with the threatener. The bottom line is, it is YOUR rig, do it YOUR way, being as safe as you can, and Good Luck.
mowermech 04/21/14 09:32am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Load Range D or E

As one who has changed tire load ranges on various vehicles over the years, and kept the inflation at the vehicle manufacturer's recommendations, I can state from experience that there is a HUGE difference between a Load Range D tire at 65 PSI and a one size larger Load Range E tire at 65 PSI! There is less tire squirm, less wander, a firmer ride, and IMO, a better driving experience. I also use M&S tires on all applications. Traction is a wonderful thing! When I put new rear tires on the Southwind, Load Range F were not available, so they put Load Range G on it. I had them inflate the G tires to the same as recommended for the F. The difference in handling was incredible! When I have to replace the front tires, they will also get G rated, and be inflated to the coach builder's specs. Anyway, regardless of what the "experts" say, I have found that increasing the load range DOES have benefits, even when inflated to the same pressure as the l0ower rated tire. Just stating personal experience. As always, YMMV.
mowermech 04/21/14 08:50am Towing
RE: Load Range D or E

Weigh the trailer, then look at the load charts for the E rated tires. Chances are, you will not have to inflate them to the maximum pressure shown on the tire sidewall. Remember, that pressure (80 PSI?) is for the MAXIMUM LOAD the tire is designed to carry. If it was my trailer, I would throw away the ST tires, put LT Load Range E tires on it, inflate the tires to the pressure required by the load, and go happily on down the road! A simple and relatively foolproof way to get the inflation right is to use the "Chalk Test". On a clean, hard surface (a paved parking lot, etc.) make a chalk mark across the tread of the tire. Drive a ways, then look at the chalk mark. If the mark is worn off mostly in the middle, the tire is overinflated for the load. If the mark is worn off on the edges, the tire is under inflated for the load. If the mark is worn off evenly across the tread, the inflation is just right.
mowermech 04/21/14 06:26am Towing
RE: Friends from the "OOP'S" thread.

Made it home yesterday afternoon. Those long days behind the wheel seem longer than they used to! The best part: NO trouble with the motor home at all!
mowermech 04/21/14 06:17am Around the Campfire
RE: First time tow car with tow dolly.

I would try an emergency stop from about 60mph before it is needed. That's a lot of weight without brakes, doubt if it is legal, in many states be careful Actually, many states have braking performance standards. Here in Montana (MCA 61-9-312) you must be able to stop any "combination of vehicles" within 40 feet from 20 MPH on a clean, hard, level surface. Other states (and FMVSS) have similar standards. CA, IIRC, is 45 feet. Remember, a towed motor vehicle in many states does not meet the definition of a "trailer", and most braking laws refer to trailers. Most states do not have laws directly referencing towed motor vehicle braking. DO NOT believe ANY "List of Towing Laws", especially those sponsored by auxiliary braking manufacturers! They are wrong more often than not!
mowermech 04/19/14 08:09pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Friends from the "OOP'S" thread.

Now in Idaho Falls. At 1830 I decided "That's enough!", and I found an RV park. they were full, but they were nice enough to let me have a reserved site that won't be filled until tomorrow. Nice people here at Sunnyside Acres!
mowermech 04/19/14 07:55pm Around the Campfire
RE: rear axle on dinghy

I have a 93 Jeep Wrangler with aftermarket locking (and unlocking) front hubs so my front axle does not turn. I don't know what to say. I would NOT tow it on a dolly if it was mine. But, it isn't mine, so all I can say is read the owners manual and GOOD LUCK!
mowermech 04/18/14 09:17pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Friends from the "OOP'S" thread.

In Silver Springs, Nevada. Heading for home tomorrow, as early as I can get up, fold this thing to travel mode, and get going. I'm hoping to make it to a rest area in Central Idaho tomorrow, then on home Sunday. I will be working hard to avoid get it homeitis, though.
mowermech 04/18/14 09:14pm Around the Campfire
RE: Ball bearings!!

I just had the front bearing units replaced on a 2001 Dodge 1500 4X4. A little under $400 for the hubs from O'Reilly, and $364 at Tire-Rama for the installation. While they had it apart, I had them replace both front axle shaft u-joints. I have driven some very old vehicles in my life, and I have never had a rusted out oil pan! My son is driving a 1994 Dodge Ram 3500 CTD with 279K on it, that was used in California and Montana for most of its life. It still, as far as we know, has the original oil pan. Yes, definitely, find a better mechanic!
mowermech 04/18/14 08:22am Tow Vehicles
RE: tow vehicle

As previously stated, it is a coating of rubber dust on the exhaust system pipes. The dust is stirred up from the roadway by the passage of your vehicles. There is no way to avoid it. It is not "vehicle specific". I have occasionally encountered it after towing a Jeep for a long distance (several hundred miles) without starting it. It has been my experience that it dissipates rapidly, with no dire consequences.
mowermech 04/18/14 08:09am Dinghy Towing
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