Open Roads Forum

Print  |  Close

Topic: towing with a f150

Posted By: librty02 on 10/18/09 04:51pm

Curious how many people tow a 30' trailer with a F150. Mine is a 08 fx4 supercab with the 5.4L and 3.73 rear end. I am looking to purchase a new keystone outback or passport in the upcoming spring both would have about the same max dry weight of 6500 lbs. The tow rating of the truck is 8900lbs with the 80% rule on that being 7120 lbs. Im just wondering how well my truck will pull this size trailer your imput will be greatly appreciated thanks


2011 FORD F-150 FX4 CREW CAB ECOBOOST!!!
2013 Keystone Passport 2650BH, EQUAL-I-ZER 1K/10K


Posted By: en3chix on 10/18/09 05:06pm

I towed a Surveyor SV291 with a '90 F150 that had 150,000 + on it. The truck was ragged out but towed the camper ok. I din't try and tackle an mountains. I always took it easy and let the truck do the work and not force it. I think you will be fine. The weight police on hear probably tell you different. Just take it easy, make sure your hitch and brake controller are set up right and enjoy your self.


DW '73, DD '99, DD '03
'09 Jayco Eagle 314 BHDS
'06 Chevy 2500 D-max 4x4


Posted By: downtheroad on 10/18/09 05:16pm

IF you want to follow the mythical 80% rule you will not make it. The 6500 dry weight with options, gear, liquids, etc. will be much more than your target 7120...Remember, no one camps in a dry weight trailer.

Keep in mind, regardless what is posted here on the net, the numbers and specs for the truck and trailer are the true determiner. How much under those numbers you want to be or how much over weight you are comfortable with is up to you.


"If we couldn't laugh we would all go insane."
GMC Duramax LBZ
Komfort
Reese Dual Cam HP
Our Rig Picture...CLICK HERE




Posted By: murphy38 on 10/18/09 05:23pm

We pulled our 33' trailer with a f150 and it did ok on flat ground but after a trip to Skyline Drive Va. I found it was time for a new truck. Did not do well in the mountains at all. If you are just going to be on flat ground give it a try and see how you feel about, who knows might be ok for where you are towing.


Larry

The Murphy's RVing Adventures and Photo Site
Our Wed Albums


Posted By: Campinfan on 10/18/09 05:35pm

The 80 % rule was made up to account for the other 20% going into gear, gas, occupants etc in the truck. I had a 30 footer with my 06 F 150 and never had any trouble.


______________________
2008 F 250 FX4 4WD, V10, 4.10 Tow Command
37' 2014 Cougar 330 RBK (Can't get photo to post here no matter what)
Lovely wife and three children


Posted By: familyman_2 on 10/18/09 06:55pm

I have a f150 (5.4L w/ 3.55 diff)and trailer that totals just under 28' and 6400 lbs gross. With 2 adults, 2 kids and all the goods I wouldn't want anything bigger or heavier.

My truck is the older engine with 2 valves and alittle less power also doesn't help that I have the 3.55 diff.

Hope this helps.
Al


Me '69
DW '70
DD '96
DS '99

2008 Rockwood Roo 25RS
2001 23rbs Travelstar (sold)
2000 Suburban 1500 4x4, 3.73 rear diff., Prodigy, Equalizer Hitch
2003 F-150 5.4L, 2WD, 3.55LS rear diff.

Trying hard to camp to much...Hasn't happened yet!


Posted By: carlstone05 on 10/18/09 07:36pm

My uncle used to tow a 34' tt with an F-150. I thought the truck was too small, but he said it did just fine. He towed from MN to TX and everywhere in between without an issue. I don't know the weight, but I would guess at least 6500#.

Good Luck and Happy Camping!
Carlstone


2005 Suburban 1500 2WD, 5.3L, 4.10
Prodigy Brake Control
Equal-i-zer Sway/Weight Distribution
2008 Cherokee Grey Wolf 26BH, Patriot Edition II



Posted By: LAdams on 10/18/09 07:36pm

Well, looking at the BASE figures I would say you'll be close to maximums and the overall TT lengths are a few feet longer than you actually state... Also bare in mind that delivered weight (UVW) is apt to be heavier than brochure weights...

The tow rating of the truck, while somewhat important as a guideline, is overshadowed by the truck's GVWR and GCWR numbers... Some would argue on these forums that these numbers are merely guidelines for warranty purposes, but I feel they are meaningful numbers which dictate the trucks overall performance and longivity...

The current trend on this forum, Towing, and Tow Vehicle forum subscribes to the theory that GVWR and GCWR are just manufacturers ratings for warranty and vehicle performance and can be exceeded without issue... I do not subscribe to that theory and use GVWR/GCWR as my maximum ratings for my tow vehicle...

That said, remember that all the opinions you receive here are just that - opinions, and as such, are worth about as much as you are going to pay for them...

Personally, I think your going to be close to maximums or possibly exceeding them, depending on how heavy you load your truck and trailer and how your truck and trailer are optioned out... The best thing to do is to weigh the combination and drive the combination and see how it feels you...

IMHO, a bit too much trailer for the truck, but other opinions will vary (I'm sure!!)

Oh and BTW - I used to own an F-150 and I loved the truck... Much more comfortable, better looking and nicer ride than my current F-250, but my F-250 is a towing beast - - - which my F-150 was not ...

Les



Passports

300BH 3050BH

Shipping Weight 5484 & 5725

Carrying Capacity 2051 & 1475

Hitch 535 & 590

Length 33' 6 & 32' 8"



Outbacks

300BH 301BQ

Shipping Weight 6729 & 7050

Carrying Capacity 1471 & 1150

Hitch 685 & 700

Length 32' 8 & 33' 6


2000 Ford F-250SD, XLT, 4X4 Off Road, SuperCab
w/ 6.8L (415 C.I.) V-10/3:73LS/4R100
Banks Power Pack w/Trans Command & OttoMind
Sold Trailer - not RV'ing at this point in time



HUNTER THERMOSTAT INSTALL

HOME MADE WHEEL CHOCKS


Posted By: librty02 on 10/18/09 08:04pm

ok I think I found the perfect floorplan for me and my family its the keystone passport 2590BH. Listed at 4930 shipped 550 hitch weight and 28'10".


Posted By: smkettner on 10/18/09 08:09pm

I pull 26' and probably 7300# with an old 260hp 5.4 and right at the rating, no worries.


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
675 watts solar
Send a PM if I missed something


Posted By: downtheroad on 10/18/09 08:22pm

librty02 wrote:

ok I think I found the perfect floorplan for me and my family its the keystone passport 2590BH. Listed at 4930 shipped 550 hitch weight and 28'10".

Much better match for you truck.


Posted By: blams2004 on 10/18/09 08:52pm

The Passport 2590 is very similar to the Jayco Jayflight 26H that I tow with my F-150 5.4 3.73. You should have no problems whatsoever. You will have some peace of mind that you can load er up a little more and still tow reasonably well with that setup. Good Luck and keep us posted.


2008 Jayco JayFlight 26BH cabinet upgrade and upholstery upgrade
Tow Vehicle- 2011 Toyota Tundra Rock Warrior---Black on Black
Bone Stock and will stay that way
5.7 L 4.30 Rear End



Posted By: RV_haulr on 10/18/09 11:33pm

I had a 2001 F-150 before I bought my Nissan. My trailer is a 27' Komfort 6400 dry and 7900 lbs. maxxed out. The 150 would tow it but we have some killer mountains out here and it was not a pleasent trip trying to keep things rolling at a reasonable speed. If that doesn't bother you, I guess it is OK. ...RVH


27' Komfort 27T. 2005 Nissan Titan Crew Cab.
Just me and the wife.

RETIRED : Operating/Stationary Engineer
IUOE Local 501 Los Angeles,Ca.



Posted By: shum02 on 10/19/09 04:47am

I have the F150 in sig with a 26' KZ that hits the scales at 7000lbs on the axles. With myself and family plus gear in the truck, over 900lbs in tongue weight I'm at the GCVWR of the truck at 15000lbs. Really from a performance view that's as much as you want with a F150.


2006 F350 Lariat FX4 CC 4x4 PSD
2007 KZ2505QSS-F Outdoorsman
Camping Pic's and Mods
Winter Camping Tips and Tricks



Posted By: dylanthecat on 10/19/09 09:51am

I have a 31RKS Jayco, which I just pulled this weekend with my F-150. Trailer ready to go weighs 7,800 - 7900. Measured tongue weight was 960. Truck weight is about 6,150 with me, my wife, and small dog. Add in the tongue gets me to about 7,100. This combination pulls OK. I am able to get up to speed and drive at the posted speed limit, and I feel safe. What I find interesting is I am at 85% of the listed 9,300 pound towing rating. I can’t figure out though how I could get closer to that limit with out overloading the truck, while maintaining proper tongue weight. (not that I want too get heavier)

I also pull this with a 2500 HD GMC with the big 8.1 V8. This truck pulls the load better. Much better acceleration and even speeds up and down hills. The rear end of the truck seems more stable than the Ford I believe, which would make sense. I can actually load gear in this truck when I am pulling, unlike the Ford.


Robert

If, when completion of a design is imminent, field dimensions are finally supplied as they actually are, instead of as they were meant to be, it is always simpler to start over from scratch.


Posted By: shum02 on 10/19/09 11:33am

Ford like everyone else calculates max towing with one driver weighing 145lbs, full tank of gas and a 10% tongue weight.

Unrealistic at best but I guess you need somewhere to start.


Posted By: conmoto on 10/19/09 03:06pm

I tow a 29ft tongue to bumper tt that weighs in loaded at 6200 lbs. I have an 06 F150 5.4 w/3:55. I have felt comfortable in all towing situations except very high winds. We have not traveled the Rockies but have pulled it about 4000 miles through the mid-west and Smokies (just big hills not mountains) I do not win any races but but get there just fine.


Posted By: TorivioTribe on 10/19/09 03:30pm

We pull our 30' TT with a E350 with the 5.4 also. We are able to maintain 65 mph without problems. Of course, we get 'bogged down' going up the bigger hills. But then again, we aren't trying to get there as quickly as we can. We get there when ever we can. Traveling the hills of WV, we would go down to 45 on I-79. However, the 'hill' from El Centro heading to San Diego (I-8), we got down to 30mph. Slow and steady, but we did pass a 'big rig' up that hill.


The Torivio Tribe
Pat (37), Pam (37), Joshua (11), Madison (9), Megan (8), Mackenzie (7), Mary (5), James (4), Molly (2)


1998 Ford E-350 15 Passenger Van
1986 Coachman PUP
2008 Jayco Jay Feather 30U TT



Posted By: librty02 on 10/19/09 07:44pm

ok so from what i get so far I should be in good shape with a passport 2590bh.
its 5000 lbs so Im assuming 7000 with passengers and gear at most


Posted By: labman1014 on 10/19/09 08:24pm

i tow a 34ft FR Surveyor SV304LE, 7200#-7400# loaded.....


TV-2008 Ford F150 SCrew, 4X4, 5.4L, 3.73LS, Rear Camera
TT-2008 Surveyor SV-304LE
Hensley Arrow-P3

Just me-'77, the wife-'81, daughter-'05, son-'07, and son-'09!!!



Posted By: mosseater on 10/19/09 10:49pm

It sounds like the Passport is a little better match. You'll be near max no matter what you do, but I do max every time I tow and it does fine. You won't drive it like it isn't back there, but as long as you get a good hitch set up and brake controller and don't thrash it around, you shouldn't have any problem. I have a smidge more wheelbase than you but my setup is very stable, even in wind. I assume you have the 6spd trans? The only thing you might want for is more power, IMHO. And maybe better shocks. Good luck and have fun!


"It`s not important that you know all the answers, it`s only important to know where to get all the answers" Arone Kleamyck
"...An unarmed man can only flee from evil, and evil is not overcome by fleeing from it." Col. Jeff Cooper
Sunset Creek 298 BH



Posted By: shum02 on 10/20/09 05:44am

Power wise the 5.4L is fine at it's max what it lacks or what people seem to want is "effortless" power. Power that comes out of a big block or turbo diesel. 300HP and close to 400ft/lbs of torque is tons of power to pull 7000lbs but you have to use the throttle and tranny in order for her to pull away and for some reason a lot of people seem unwilling to step on it. Take this truck out empty and mash the pedal, it'll move!


Posted By: hedge on 10/20/09 07:38am

I guess you guys are more brave than I am. I was pulling a 27' 5700lb dry trailer and it seemed like too much for my '06/5.4/3.73. On a nice calm day it was fine but not fun in the wind, It also spent a lot of time in 2nd gear up the hills. I've since went to a 350 and it toes it with ease.


2012 F350 Diesel
2013 Adventurer 89RB


Posted By: MDM8770 on 10/20/09 11:38am

I tow an 8318SS Rockwood with a 2007 F150, 4X4 Supercrew, 5.4 and 7.73. Had a few issues on steep grades. Put on a cold air filter (K&N) and have had no issues. Would like more power but had the truck before I found the deal on the Rockwood. If/when I upgrade I will go to a larger diesel and a 5w. Good luck, stay safe. Marc


"2 Far From Retirement 2 Wait to Travel!"
Marc, Jane, Morgan and Marcus (The Crew)
07 F150 Supercrew & 06 Rockwood 8318SS
RVing since 1990 but this is the 1st TT


Posted By: jyh818 on 10/20/09 12:23pm

I pull a 26 ft Nomad (6050 lbs. dry) with a V10 Excursion 3.73 diff. It pulls ok, but going up hills, I have to downshift and the RPMs is up there in the 4K range. The Excursion is based off a F250 platform. I can feel the trailer pull me over towards the left whenever a semi passes me. Otherwise, it's fine.

I couldn't imagine towing it with a F150 V8. It would be tough, but not impossible.


2002 Ford Excursion XLT 6.8L V-10 2WD, 4.30 Limited Slip
Rear Hellwig Sway Bar
2009 Skyline Nomad 260
Prodigy Brake Controller
EAZ-Lift WD Hitch



Posted By: shum02 on 10/20/09 01:38pm

jyh818 wrote:

I pull a 26 ft Nomad (6050 lbs. dry) with a V10 Excursion 3.73 diff. It pulls ok, but going up hills, I have to downshift and the RPMs is up there in the 4K range. The Excursion is based off a F250 platform. I can feel the trailer pull me over towards the left whenever a semi passes me. Otherwise, it's fine.

I couldn't imagine towing it with a F150 V8. It would be tough, but not impossible.


Sounds like you have setup issues aswell.


Posted By: jyh818 on 10/21/09 07:11am

shum02 wrote:

jyh818 wrote:

I pull a 26 ft Nomad (6050 lbs. dry) with a V10 Excursion 3.73 diff. It pulls ok, but going up hills, I have to downshift and the RPMs is up there in the 4K range. The Excursion is based off a F250 platform. I can feel the trailer pull me over towards the left whenever a semi passes me. Otherwise, it's fine.

I couldn't imagine towing it with a F150 V8. It would be tough, but not impossible.


Sounds like you have setup issues aswell.

I just read another post in the forum and someone mentioned about the squishy feeling when a semi passes you. That is what I get. He said that this is due to the tires not being filled to the max. pressure. My Michelin load E tires has max at 80 psi, but I only filled them to 60 psi. Maybe I'll fill them up to see if that makes a difference.


Posted By: dthfsa on 10/21/09 09:13am

I have a Passport 280BH. Unloaded weight is 4300 lbs, According to the sticker in the cabinet. I pull it with a F150 with a 5.4 l with 3.73 axle. The truck has a towing capacity of 9300 lbs. I personally would not want anymore trailer for this truck. I would say fully loaded we are easily pushing 5500 lbs if not more. I have never weighted it. I would not mind having a little more truck when I get into the mountains heading east.
Just my opinion, but I feel this is a good match for the truck for the trips we take. We took a trip to PA and a trip to WI this year and it did great, like I stated in some cases it would be nice to have that little extra power on a mountain pull.
Running normal interstate 60 to 65 is not a problem.


2008 Keystone
Passport 280BH
2007 F150 5.4 - Supercrew


Posted By: Kwattro on 10/21/09 10:19am

I'm now pulling about 9000lbs with my '06 F-150 SuperCrew 5.4L 3.73. It towed exceptionally well aside from hills where you'd really have to work the engine. I resolved the hill power issue with a supercharger. Now I'm just under 440hp and just a bit over 500lb.ft of torque. Cost me $2000 for the blower kit, installed myself, and $400 for a custom tune on my programmer. I now have that "effortless" towing that everyone wants for much cheaper than a new truck.


2007 Kingsport 286RLS 31' 6747 Dry 8900 Loaded
2006 Ford F-150 SuperCrew FX4 5.4L - FOR SALE
2006 Ford F-350 SuperCrew FX4 6.0L


Posted By: shum02 on 10/21/09 11:51am

jyh818 wrote:

shum02 wrote:

jyh818 wrote:

I pull a 26 ft Nomad (6050 lbs. dry) with a V10 Excursion 3.73 diff. It pulls ok, but going up hills, I have to downshift and the RPMs is up there in the 4K range. The Excursion is based off a F250 platform. I can feel the trailer pull me over towards the left whenever a semi passes me. Otherwise, it's fine.

I couldn't imagine towing it with a F150 V8. It would be tough, but not impossible.


Sounds like you have setup issues aswell.

I just read another post in the forum and someone mentioned about the squishy feeling when a semi passes you. That is what I get. He said that this is due to the tires not being filled to the max. pressure. My Michelin load E tires has max at 80 psi, but I only filled them to 60 psi. Maybe I'll fill them up to see if that makes a difference.


The Excursion has a few issues regarding it's handling that are curable and will go a long way towards a very comfortable tow with this ultimate SUV. Search the forums here and on some of the Ford diesel sites to come up with some great and not expensive solutions. Your X should handle that weight/length effortlessly.


Posted By: smkettner on 10/23/09 09:55pm

Skip the 250 and get a srw 350 for the increased payload.


Posted By: bobbyg123 on 10/22/09 04:32pm

krazymatt wrote:

I wouldn't tow anything heavier than 5000lbs loaded with a 1/2 ton period.


LOL, are you serious?

The new F150 can be equipped with a tow rating of 11,200lbs. This truck can easily handle a 7500lb trailer. No question about it.


2008 Jayfeather 29A
2007 Ford F-150 5.4L V8


Posted By: mosseater on 10/23/09 11:10am

Quote:

Also, found out something on our first trip. The Ford factory receiver is flexing. Not bending, just flexing. Time to toss that and get a Curt receiver. More $$$ for the beast.

It will also evetually begin to stretch the pin box if you try to jack proper weight into the front axle. I changed mine to a Drawtite UltraFrame receiver and it is night and day. The OEM hitch is not up to the task for which they have rated it, IMO. 1100 lbs????? HA! Not on this planet.

I don't ever think the issue of "1/2 ton" towing capabilities will ever be resolved since the expectation bar has been lifted so high and modern diesel trucks have become so accessible and user-friendly. That does not mean towing with a gas engine, 1/2 ton pickup should be stricken from the list of possibilities. Is my combination optimum? Heck no, but it does fine and I'm perfectly happy with it. Most of us use these trucks as daily drivers also, and the percentage of time they are used to tow makes more sense to many of us as long as we stay inside the ratings. If you want or need and can afford a bigger truck with a diesel engine, more power to you (pun intended). But this constant chest beating is getting a little old. It wasn't that long ago that the performance of todays 1/2 tons would have been considered stellar. Just because trucks have evolved to a higher point doesn't mean anything less is now unacceptable. It wasn't so long ago that I was a complete noob on this forum and did quite a bit of reading before choosing my truck. I'd hate to see some other newbie spend a whole bunch more money they ever needed to spend because some here folks decided they want to have more truck than they need. Perfectly fine for them, not neccessary for all. Let's get real, please.


Posted By: shum02 on 10/23/09 12:14pm

krazymatt wrote:

I towed my 2008 Puma 26rlss with a dry weight of about 6300lbs for a couple months in the mountains of Northern NM for about 5 camping trips then I went with a 08 Dodge CTD w/ engine brake. Complete night and day difference. It's the difference between a white knuckle roller coaster ride to a relaxing Sunday drive. .


Ya think?! Jeeze a turbo 5.9L diesel 2500/3500 series truck compared to a 5.4L normally aspirated gasser 1/2 ton. Yea I guess it would be night and day especially in the mountains with the turbo


Posted By: jlktbk on 10/23/09 12:26pm

Wow 6 to 7mpg you have setup problems I have an 08.5 nissan titan cc which are notorious for poor gas mileage,I pull a 08 rockwood ultra light that weighs 6500 lightly loaded and 7000 heavy I'm in south carolina now pulled 350 miles from tennessee thru the mountains asheville etc. We never strained the truck 3250rpms in 3rd was it 10 mpgs all the way


Posted By: mosseater on 10/23/09 06:25pm

I can get close to double digit MPG if I don't carry water and stay out of the big hills. That's the stuff of dreams, but alas, it makes for a boring towing experience. I love it when the bloody sweat literally drips from my knuckles and runs down onto the floor mat. The kids go wild for that.


Posted By: schwartzworld on 10/23/09 06:31pm

jlktbk wrote:

Wow 6 to 7mpg you have setup problems I have an 08.5 nissan titan cc which are notorious for poor gas mileage,I pull a 08 rockwood ultra light that weighs 6500 lightly loaded and 7000 heavy I'm in south carolina now pulled 350 miles from tennessee thru the mountains asheville etc. We never strained the truck 3250rpms in 3rd was it 10 mpgs all the way


You have to compare apples to apples before you say that there is a setup problem. Our trucks are several years apart, the technology is different between the years, yours is new, mine has 40,000 miles on it.


Posted By: schwartzworld on 10/23/09 06:56pm

This is the air intake mod I did on my F150.





Posted By: cardrb on 10/23/09 07:14pm

I have a 2005 F150, 5.4 engine with a 3.73 rear end, we tow a Salem 30QBSS which is roughly 6700lbs, dry weight. I did a Banks Air Intake with an Edge Programmer, amaziing difference in the truck, the towing programing with the Edge made a huge difference in the motor and the performance of the truck, my mileage did go up, however not by much. The over all performance was worth the price of the intake system and the programmer. My next add on to the truck will be a banks exhaust system this will complete the mods to my truck.

I would recommend anyone using an F150 to get an intake system and programmer for their truck.


Posted By: Roy M on 10/23/09 09:38pm

We need to upgrade our truck next spring and are torn between an F-150 or similar GM/Dodge and a 250. We are currently pulling a 17' fifth wheel with a Ranger but want a 23-24' down the road. The lighter trucks are much more attractively priced and more than enough to handle present needs but will we be back to a marginal vehicle with the larger trailer and need to upgrade again. We mostly travel in the B.C. mountains and prefer secondary routes, the road less traveled. I would not consider trying a 30' behind such a vehicle.


Old age and treachery always beats youth and enthusiasm


Posted By: Wes Tausend on 10/24/09 03:07am

Roy M wrote:

We need to upgrade our truck next spring and are torn between an F-150 or similar GM/Dodge and a 250. We are currently pulling a 17' fifth wheel with a Ranger but want a 23-24' down the road. The lighter trucks are much more attractively priced and more than enough to handle present needs but will we be back to a marginal vehicle with the larger trailer and need to upgrade again. We mostly travel in the B.C. mountains and prefer secondary routes, the road less traveled. I would not consider trying a 30' behind such a vehicle.


I think the main reason, besides initial cost, to get a F-150, is better mileage (better ride too) when using the truck for non-towing. The compared truck tare weight differences, possible transmission differences, and certainly differential differences make the 250 a bit of a gas hog under light load. When used for heavy towing, there is usually not a nickels worth the difference in fuel economy since the mpg is about the same. Durability used to be an issue but not so much anymore. If a properly equipped F-150 is rated to pull a particular 30 footer, why not? But if the truck will be mainly used for towing only, then go 250 or larger.

A strange thing about differentials. As an upside, Ford used to use the 9 inch in half tons which was a very strong gearset because it meshed more teeth and had a front pinion support bearing. But one of the downsides to the 9 inch was that, because it meshed more teeth than the Chevy 12 bolt, it caused greater drag. The 9 inch pinion ran low in the case allowing the teeth to mesh at a tangent to the ring gear, engaging more teeth at one time. So Ford switched to the 8.8 inch, which rides higher on the ring gear, meshing less teeth, and more closely matching the lower driveline friction loss of Chevy. The Ford 8.8 and Chevy 12 bolt are almost the same.

The Ford Ranger started out by using the tiny 7.5 inch gearset which just happens to be about the size of the Chevy 10 bolt. By having a high mounted pinion and meshing very few teeth, the diff was able to offer very low drag and consequently compete with renowned Chevy fuel economy. As more demands were made on Ranger weight capacity, Ford upped the engine and gave it the half ton gearset, the 8.8.

Now, even greater demands are being made on the half ton, so Ford offers a heavier duty gearset for it, 9.5 inch I believe. They don't do too bad on fuel economy, so perhaps there is a trick to gaining durability and yet maintaining low drag fuel economy under light load conditions.

In the case of the 10.5 inch offered in the F-250 Super Duty and in the one time Excursion, Ford did spec Synthetic lube, at least in the Excursion. I assume for reasons of lowering drag and extending fuel economy. A lot of folks used these gas hogs for daily drivers and the backlash from the "Green" sector eventually caused Ford to discontinue this beloved 3/4 ton in favor of an upgraded and more fuel efficient 1/2 ton extra long Expedition XL.

Wes

...


Days spent camping are not subtracted from one's total.
- 2000 Excursion V-10 - 2000 F-250 CC 7.3L V-8
- 2004 Cougar Keystone M-294 RLS, 6140# tare
- Hensley Arrow - Champion 4000w/3500w gen
- Linda, Wes and Quincy the Standard Brown Poodle
...


Posted By: shum02 on 10/26/09 06:15am

cardrb wrote:


I would recommend anyone using an F150 to get an intake system and programmer for their truck.


I got a warranty so that won't happen. My dealer warned me in no uncertain terms that if I put on a programmer and break something in my motor\drivetrain I'll be on the hook to prove that the programmer didn't do it as they will void the entire engine and powertrain warranty.

Don't have a warranty? Go for it as I've heard the 5.4L responds fantastic to it due to Fords very conservative factory programming! If on the other hand you have a 4.6L in yours don't bother wasting the cash as she's pretty much at the wall unless your going to go old school with hardware and not software upgrades.


Posted By: Wes Tausend on 10/26/09 09:44am

shum02 wrote:

cardrb wrote:


I would recommend anyone using an F150 to get an intake system and programmer for their truck.


I got a warranty so that won't happen. My dealer warned me in no uncertain terms that if I put on a programmer and break something in my motor\drivetrain I'll be on the hook to prove that the programmer didn't do it as they will void the entire engine and powertrain warranty.

Don't have a warranty? Go for it as I've heard the 5.4L responds fantastic to it due to Fords very conservative factory programming! If on the other hand you have a 4.6L in yours don't bother wasting the cash as she's pretty much at the wall unless your going to go old school with hardware and not software upgrades.


Such as if one uses a 4.6L crate 1999/2001 (320HP/317ft) or 2003-2004 (390HP/390ft) Ford Mustang SVT Cobra. Warranty? If it breaks of course, a man has to convince Fedex that it happened during shipping.

Wes

...


Posted By: logsam on 10/26/09 09:52am

I think you'll be okay. I have a 22' ECO that is 3800 lbs. dry and empty. Under 6000 loaded up, w/out water. I had a 2004 F-150 w/ 5.4, 3.55, auto, swb scab, and tow package.(By the way never figured out why a 3.55 in a tow vehicle, but it was nice on the hwy. not towing.)I found it adequate for towing in N.Florida and had no problem w/ handling.

I now have a 2006 Dodge w/ 5.9 CTD, stock. Biggest reason was the Ford's fuel tank was the size of a butter bean (26 gals. I think?) I got simply tired of fueling every 200 or so miles.

We are planning a trip out west next spring and I wanted to do more than plan the next fuel stop. Plus I wanted the power and the extra mpg are nice. Like someone said in an earlier post I am certainly not wealthy, but I looked for a year and found a deal I was happy with and made the trade.

I miss my F-150 for the quiet and smooth ride it offered. But, so far the diesel is more economical fuel wise. I was wanting a new F-150 for the 6 speed AND the larger fuel tank, but the Dodge came along. I couldn't have swung a deal on a new Ford anyway, so I guess it was a good thing.

I guess I didn't help much, but I've been there.


Posted By: go6car on 10/26/09 10:01am

Liberty -

We have that same 08 FX4 you mentioned initially, and we pull an 09 Outback Sydney 29RLS (34 feet nose to tail), which is about 7000 dry. We're in Southern NJ (not a lot of hills) but go to the Poconos, and to MD, and generally stay within about a 4 hour radius for our trips. About 3 times a year we hit the tracks (with full water tanks, generators in the truck bed, etc.) at our "heaviest" towing set up.

We're at the upper end of our weights in general, but let let me just tell you that we were really impressed with how well this truck does. A good hitch and weight distribution set up (plus some added stiff super springs that ended up raising the back end ~2/3 inches) makes this a really great experience if your objective is like ours -- relatively local towing.

If you're planning on going far (real mountains; cross country with altitude, etc.), you might want a bit more power. We didn't, and our truck also is really a daily driver, so this set up for our truck is really pretty darn good. We get the most out of the truck everyday, and it also is really good moonlighting as our tow vehicle in the Spring, Summer and early Fall.

Like any towing experience, you will notice you're pulling something and the truck's RPMs will go up when doing up hill - as it's DESIGNED to do. Any trailer will also move a bit if a big rig passes you, or if the wind is really strong. We've been in all these scenarios and it's not an issue.

Of course, like anything, the lighter the trailer, the easier the truck does. My point is simply, we choose to pull ours at the upper end of the limits and were really pleased with how it did and wanted to give you that two cents since the setup you described is our real world experience now.

As another poster mentioned -- the newer 150s are far superior with their tow setups (our last 150 was an '00 FX4). The two trucks are night and day with capability and overall tow experience.

Good luck with whatever decision you make!


2013 Coachmen Encounter 36KS
2004 Jeep Wrangler



Posted By: Wes Tausend on 10/21/09 03:04pm

...

I don't think there is anything wrong with towing with an F-150. I'll guess the weight of the truck to be about 5500 to 6000 pounds. Ford did up the tow rating of F-150's as of late, and I think they have a bigger rear axle than earlier 150's, but sometimes softer rear springs and shocks. The weak link is probably the transmission in that it may overheat easier than heavier duty F-250 trannys. Some F-150's may have the heavy duty tranny.

If the tranny doesn't overheat, it will usually live the life of the truck. But that is a choice the driver can make, whether to push it beyond limits. A tranny temp gauge and aftermarket cooler aren't a bad idea on any size truck. And I believe Ford has a rigorous tranny fluid exchange schedule to keep replacing overheated portions (from hot spots) before they can gell enough to wreck fluid performance.

I once briefly pulled a 5300 dry/weight 28 foot trailer with a V6 ½ ton Mazda, same as a Ford Ranger mini-truck, about 4000 pounds. The Mazda tow rating would have been up to about 5600 pounds, except I had a manual tranny which restricted it to around 3600.

At 140 HP, the only way the Mazda would climb any hill would be in lower gears which would likely promptly overheat the meshed little gear teeth in the manual. Fourth gear is non-meshed, locked straight through, and can run indefinately without overheating, if one could stay in fourth. Fifth (OD) is meshed and weak again.

The only hill I met was a simple expressway overpass which dropped it from 40 to 30 mph in a hurry. I'm sure it would go anywhere, very slowly, until the tranny died on a hill. The size of the truck looked silly on the large camper and I never ever took it on a high-speed highway.

Our Excursion is now a proper, and legal, match, maybe even overkill on semi-level roads. Even with the large tranny, the tranny fluid is recommended to swap out every 30k miles.

I think the tranny is almost always the weakest link on any truck.

Wes

...


Posted By: pocman on 10/21/09 04:56pm

I'm not liking what I'm reading here. I just purchased a 2010 f-150 with the 5.4l 3.73. It has the max tow package and has a maximum tow package of 11300lbs. Now, I'm not silly enough to think that this truck can pull that weight safely, but I would like to think it could handle between 6000-8000lbs.

I get a laugh at some of the people on here that say "Well I had an F-150, but it would not handle my 6000lb travel trailer, so I went out and got an F-350. Now it hauls like a dream."

No Sh@t.... I don't know about most of the people on here, but I'm not making big money. If I could afford an F-350, then I would buy one, but to say that the F-150 can't haul an average size trailer, is wrong, in my opinion....

Sorry to vent.....

I'm looking at a 30ft trailer with a dry weight of 5800-6500lbs, and now wondering if this truck is going to struggle with that weight.


Posted By: bobbyg123 on 10/21/09 05:24pm

pocman wrote:

I'm not liking what I'm reading here. I just purchased a 2010 f-150 with the 5.4l 3.73. It has the max tow package and has a maximum tow package of 11300lbs. Now, I'm not silly enough to think that this truck can pull that weight safely, but I would like to think it could handle between 6000-8000lbs.

I'm looking at a 30ft trailer with a dry weight of 5800-6500lbs, and now wondering if this truck is going to struggle with that weight.


This website and most all of the posters here have been a huge help to me over the years as I've ramped up my learning curve. The one possible exception has been the opinions on tow vehicle selection. It's not the advice has been bad; however many of the posters jump to the knee-jerk side of suggesting that people purchase 1-ton rigs to pull a camper 10 times a year. There are a lot of data points to consider before telling people what they can or should tow with.

Last March, we purchased a Jayco Jayfeather that weighs in at 6500lbs fully loaded. I'm towing her with a 2007 F150 super crew that is "rated" to pull 9,200lbs. I live in the Pacific Northwest and have towed my trailer over our major mountain passes 4 times with absolutely no problems at all. Yes, the RPM's jump to 3500 up the steepest slopes, but never has my speed dipped below 55MPH. I'm sure bigger rigs do it more efficiently, but I wouldn't drive more than 60MPH in an F550, let alone a 1/2 ton.

The debate on whether "you can, or can't" tow something comes down to simple math. Keep the within the rated weight limits of your GVWR (truck), GVWR (trailer), GCWR (both), Payload/hitch weight, and truck axle ratings and you'll be fine. With my setup, I'm under the payload, under the axle weights, under the GVR's and GCWR's, and under the hitch weight.

We have a family friend who is the service manager for a group of Ford dealerships here in the area. I emailed him a question on tow limits during my search, and he simplified things considerably. He said to subtract 25% from whatever the listed tow rating of your truck is and purchase a trailer with a GVWR at or below that number. That's exactly what I did, and it worked out perfectly. My F150 has a tow rating of 9200lbs. When you subtract 25% from that, you come up with 6,900lbs. Guess what? The GVWR of our Jayfeather is 6,850lbs and it not only tows very well, but it's also below all of the critical weight limits for both the truck and trailer.

People will try and scare you about this stuff and how 1/2 tons aren't durable enough to withstand the beating of heavy towing. That may be true, but if anyone wants to tell me that towing my set up 10 times each year is bad despite the fact that I'm below all of my weights, they can take that opinion elsewhere. My truck will last as long as I want to keep her.


Posted By: librty02 on 10/21/09 07:18pm

ha i love that last response I must say I do tow my pop up now with loaded weight of 3500 and I load that bed up heavily due to lack of storage with the pup. I would quess around 5500 lbs with trailer passengers and all the gear in the bed and to be absolutely honest with you once the truck gets moving I dont even know Im pulling anything. Now now I know its just a pup but a good bit of weight is there too. So people saying the truck cant pull 6500 lbs loaded I IMHO really shouldnt be towing anything then. Sorry just venting too been a long week already But I would love to thank everyone for all the replies and keep them coming


Posted By: hedge on 10/21/09 08:36pm

Deleted

* This post was edited 10/21/09 10:10pm by hedge *


Posted By: shum02 on 10/22/09 05:41am

pocman wrote:

I'm not liking what I'm reading here. I just purchased a 2010 f-150 with the 5.4l 3.73. It has the max tow package and has a maximum tow package of 11300lbs. Now, I'm not silly enough to think that this truck can pull that weight safely, but I would like to think it could handle between 6000-8000lbs.

.


You'll have zero issues with that weight. I have been pulling 7000lbs on the axles of my KZ with a 2007 with 5.4L and 3:73's for 3 years and have no issues. The tranny with the tow package is well equipped to handle all the heat this combo with throw at it as well as an upgraded maxi core radiator.

The sky is falling, the sky is falling.................! Goodness people give it a rest!


Posted By: greyeyes819 on 10/22/09 08:55am

shum02 wrote:

pocman wrote:

I'm not liking what I'm reading here. I just purchased a 2010 f-150 with the 5.4l 3.73. It has the max tow package and has a maximum tow package of 11300lbs. Now, I'm not silly enough to think that this truck can pull that weight safely, but I would like to think it could handle between 6000-8000lbs.

.


You'll have zero issues with that weight. I have been pulling 7000lbs on the axles of my KZ with a 2007 with 5.4L and 3:73's for 3 years and have no issues. The tranny with the tow package is well equipped to handle all the heat this combo with throw at it as well as an upgraded maxi core radiator.

The sky is falling, the sky is falling.................! Goodness people give it a rest!


I have an 09 F150 crew, max tow package and we are towing a 30ft tt loaded about 62-6400lbs and no problems this season at all.


Tami, Daniel
Owen & Ethan
09 F150
07 Sunset Trail 30BH
Reese Dual Cam & Prodigy Brake Control



Posted By: Wes Tausend on 10/22/09 12:35pm

shum02 wrote:

pocman wrote:

I'm not liking what I'm reading here. I just purchased a 2010 f-150 with the 5.4l 3.73. It has the max tow package and has a maximum tow package of 11300lbs. Now, I'm not silly enough to think that this truck can pull that weight safely, but I would like to think it could handle between 6000-8000lbs.

.


You'll have zero issues with that weight. I have been pulling 7000lbs on the axles of my KZ with a 2007 with 5.4L and 3:73's for 3 years and have no issues. The tranny with the tow package is well equipped to handle all the heat this combo with throw at it as well as an upgraded maxi core radiator.

The sky is falling, the sky is falling.................! Goodness people give it a rest!


I don't think you were specifically referring to me, but I have to agree with your opinion on newer F-150's being far more capable. Older F-150's and ½ tons in general weren't nearly as capable as newer F-150's, but the myth persists.

As an example, a 1980's F-150 might have issues with heavier towing loads. The rear axle dropped from the old durable 9 inch to the lighter 8.8 inch which was only about equal to the GM 12 bolt. The Ford Ranger and my Mazda mini-truck now have this 8.8 inch and I regard it as only medium duty, but passable in anything less than severe duty. I think a 9.5 inch is now the standard for ½ ton Tow Packs. Could be wrong.

The transmissions have gotten better ...but I think they are still the weak link, albeit maybe in an overall stronger chain. It wouldn't hurt to have a tranny temperature gauge if there is any chance of severe hill duty. The rest of the truck will be fine.

When I bought the ¾ ton Excursion, I bought it for the HD transmission it offered. Not that I needed it, but there was less chance the previous owner 90% fried it. My transmission shop recommended any sort of "pre-owned" ¾ ton because of the same reason. None of them are bullet-proof; as I spoke with him, there was a Chevy dually up on his lift with a fried Allison. It was an oilfield truck and my guess is he ran into a bit of mud and overheated before he knew it. Some remote campsites can get muddy, but one can choose not to go there.

Because of all this, a modern F-150 is fine for most folks and I maintain that even a Ford Ranger can barely pull the load. If it has a HD tranny. It couldn't be any slower than our trains. They only give us one horse-power per ton. And, yeah, occasionally we burn a tranny out on a long hill. They're called traction motors but that is what they are, transmissions; electric transmissions.

Wes

...


Posted By: krazymatt on 10/22/09 01:05pm

If you're in the complete flats closer to sea level as in Texas or the south it will do okay. It's the hills, mountains, and high altitudes that will eventually send you looking for a new truck. I towed my 2008 Puma 26rlss with a dry weight of about 6300lbs for a couple months in the mountains of Northern NM for about 5 camping trips then I went with a 08 Dodge CTD w/ engine brake. Complete night and day difference. It's the difference between a white knuckle roller coaster ride to a relaxing Sunday drive. The F150 deserved it's respect for towing it but on hills the engine would redline and the tranny would hit temps exceeding 220 degrees on my Edge Programmer. Going down hill you could feel the weight of the trailer being heavier than the truck (not pleasant.) Oh and I would get about 6-7 mpg max. Do what you wish, I'm not a "weight police" but I'm not going to be the one towing. My friend tows a much smaller 20ft TT with his 1/2 ton gasser and he's always complaining of the fuel mileage and the engine redlining. With the experience mentinoed I wouldn't tow anything heavier than 5000lbs loaded with a 1/2 ton period.


New Mexico
2008 Forest River Puma 26RLSS
2008 Dodge 2500 SLT Big Horn QC Cummins 4x4 6Spd Auto, Exhaust Brake.
Easy-Lift 1000 WD hitch.
2400IS Yamaha Generator


Posted By: braygor on 10/22/09 05:46pm

bobbyg123 wrote:


...
Last March, we purchased a Jayco Jayfeather that weighs in at 6500lbs fully loaded. I'm towing her with a 2007 F150 super crew that is "rated" to pull 9,200lbs. I live in the Pacific Northwest and have towed my trailer over our major mountain passes 4 times with absolutely no problems at all. Yes, the RPM's jump to 3500 up the steepest slopes, but never has my speed dipped below 55MPH. I'm sure bigger rigs do it more efficiently, but I wouldn't drive more than 60MPH in an F550, let alone a 1/2 ton...
... My truck will last as long as I want to keep her.


I tow a similar trailer with a similar truck (see below) and have nearly identical results (although towing in the Pacific Northwest is still on my to-do list!)


Two of us and two daughters, 12 & 10

Jayco JayFeather 29Y
2007 F-150 Lariat SuperCrew 5.4 V8; 3.73 Rear End
Equal-i-zer / Prodigy


Posted By: califRVers on 10/22/09 06:07pm

YIKES! My head is spinning! Well we are new to RVing but we did do some research before purchasing our Outback - 31'9", we talked to 2 of our personal friends at Ford and the service department also when we were getting our F150 serviced prior to our trailer delivery. We asked about an additional transmission cooler, weight limits, etc and we were told we would have plenty of power. Our Outbacks dry weight is 6440 we travel with the 2 of us in our supercrew cab, we have only taken it up a few hills so far and it was a champ 55mph and I know we could have gone faster but were new and didnt want to push it. Our gauges never varied. We used to tow a 24' SeaRay loaded down with gas, supplies, etc and never had issues towing that thing up mountains with 4 teenagers in the back seat.

Honestly we hardly know that 32' trailer is behind us and we have had to deal with wind. Would we like a F250, sure someday, but for now our F150 is a champ!

Just a newbies 2 cents!

* This post was edited 10/22/09 08:52pm by califRVers *


Tim and Julie
CALIFRV'ers BLOG | OUR OUTBACK

2010 OUTBACK 260FL 31'9" GVWR 7800 - Atwood 3500 - 12K Equal-i-zer - 2 Interstate 6V
2006 F150 2WD Supercrew Lariat 5.4L Triton V8 3:55 LS 139" WB



Posted By: schwartzworld on 10/22/09 06:44pm

Time for me to dive into this one.

We have a 2005 F150 Supercrew 4X4. The trailer is a Puma 29FQS. Trailers been weighed twice, once empty at 6600 pounds and loaded up on our first trip at 6850 pounds. Tongue weight is about 700 pounds. We know it's back there. The truck gets it moving but it seems like a struggle to get it going. Freeway driving is good, I usually drive 60 to 65. Hills are a challenge. Trucks RPM soar but that's what it takes to make it up the hills. If the trailer gets any heavier we're in trouble. As it is I'm at a point of different truck or turn the F150 into hauler from H*ll. I've already made a cold air intake and upgraded the rear suspension. If I keep going then we're talking LT tires, Edge computer module and less restrictive muffler.

Also, remember no matter what, the F150 isn't going to get decent MPG. I get 6.5 to 7. I want 9. Will the mods add power and MPG. Don't count on it.

Cost wise, the mods are much cheaper than another truck.

Also, found out something on our first trip. The Ford factory receiver is flexing. Not bending, just flexing. Time to toss that and get a Curt receiver. More $$$ for the beast.

So, it may seem that the F150 has more faults than pluses but it doesn't. As said in other postings, the newer F150's are built better. Up to 7000 pounds I'd still tow with the F150. If I could afford a F250/350 I would get one. My F150 is paid for and that's what I have to work with.

Fred


Posted By: Sir Buffalo on 10/22/09 06:56pm

librty02 wrote:

ok so from what i get so far I should be in good shape with a passport 2590bh.
its 5000 lbs so Im assuming 7000 with passengers and gear at most


my tt specs 28'10" and weight are very similar......you will be fine


Sir Buffalo!
2006 Zinger by Crossroads 27BHS
2010 Toyota Tundra Crew Max 5.7



Posted By: librty02 on 10/22/09 07:26pm

Im sure Ill be fine and yes im ready for my mpg to fall a bit from a pup to a tt with the pup i get a good 15 sometimes 16mpg highway pushing 70 75. But whos worried about mpg when it comes to having fun right???


Posted By: goingnorth on 10/23/09 09:55am

I got a 09 Keystone Passport 290BH Actual weight when new was 5940# + 800# TW without anything in it. Loaded for a long dry camp 6740# and 900# TW, I do tow with an F350 but I plan on getting an F150 next time around. My new trailer is 4k# lighter than my last one so I don't need the big truck anymore. I have never towed with an Fl50 and with the F350 I forget my trailer is back there and I don't tow over 65 mph, so the newer models with the integrated brake controler and anti-sway should do fine.

Soon the F150 will have the new 6.2L instead of the 5.4L, can't wait.


13 F250 6.2L XLT CCSB 4x4 4.30 gears

09 Keystone Passport 290BH UF elec jack,30"scissor jacks+Eliminator Strut Stabilizer,PD9160+wizard,custom bumper hitch,added 18.5gal FW tank,dualcam HP 1200# WD,Fantastic Fan,Axle Flip,Lexan screen door covers.
My Mods.



Posted By: Kwattro on 10/23/09 10:26am

schwartzworld wrote:

I've already made a cold air intake and upgraded the rear suspension. If I keep going then we're talking LT tires, Edge computer module and less restrictive muffler.


Cost wise, the mods are much cheaper than another truck.
My F150 is paid for and that's what I have to work with.

Fred


Schwartzworld , running as CAI without tuning will result in more noise and less power, along with putting the engine in a lean condition that can be potentially harmful. There is significant documentation, including dyno with A/F ratios showing this condition. The problem is amplified with an Edge module.

If you were to return the air intake to it's factory condition I strongly recommend getting an Edge programmer, the difference it makes in towing is like getting a different truck. So is drivability and mileage. Even better would be a Gryphon programmer if you want to add additional mods or keep existing ones.

www.powerhungryperformance.com


Posted By: schwartzworld on 10/23/09 11:04am

Kwattro wrote:

schwartzworld wrote:

I've already made a cold air intake and upgraded the rear suspension. If I keep going then we're talking LT tires, Edge computer module and less restrictive muffler.


Cost wise, the mods are much cheaper than another truck.
My F150 is paid for and that's what I have to work with.

Fred


Schwartzworld , running as CAI without tuning will result in more noise and less power, along with putting the engine in a lean condition that can be potentially harmful. There is significant documentation, including dyno with A/F ratios showing this condition. The problem is amplified with an Edge module.

If you were to return the air intake to it's factory condition I strongly recommend getting an Edge programmer, the difference it makes in towing is like getting a different truck. So is drivability and mileage. Even better would be a Gryphon programmer if you want to add additional mods or keep existing ones.

www.powerhungryperformance.com


Yep, heard about this one before. Let me clarify what I call a cold air intake. The stock box and first section of the snorkle are still there. What changed is where the truck gets it's air from. The box used to pull it's air through a hole in the fender. Mine now pulls air from the side of the grill. I used 3 inch PVC pipe to make the bend and the hookup to the stock box. Got some more power from it, so far no check engine light and it shouldn't be running lean. It just passed our wonderful state emmisions test too.

I also added a AEM high flow air filter to the stock air box. When not towing I can get almost 17 MPG. Before this mod the best I could do was 15 MPG.

I'll try to get a picture posted later.


Posted By: pacificnw on 11/07/09 12:11pm

librty02 wrote:

Curious how many people tow a 30' trailer with a F150. Mine is a 08 fx4 supercab with the 5.4L and 3.73 rear end. I am looking to purchase a new keystone outback or passport in the upcoming spring both would have about the same max dry weight of 6500 lbs. The tow rating of the truck is 8900lbs with the 80% rule on that being 7120 lbs. Im just wondering how well my truck will pull this size trailer your imput will be greatly appreciated thanks


Your tow vehicle is a great all-around puller. So in my estimation you have a really good place to start from. Go Ford!

I do not know what the GVWR is for those two trailers that you mentioned but I am guessing around 8000 based on your statement about dry weight rating. Based on these assumptions, and if you have a good load on a trailer that size, you will be at the extreme limit of your truck's towing capability.

Will your truck pull it? Yes.

Will you like it very much? No.

But if your trips are usually short distances over flat ground you might get by OK.


Posted By: rjjones on 11/07/09 09:52am

I have an F150 and tow a 29' camper and agree with LAdams. I'm in the market for an F250.


Posted By: schwartzworld on 10/26/09 10:42am

shum02 wrote:

cardrb wrote:


I would recommend anyone using an F150 to get an intake system and programmer for their truck.


I got a warranty so that won't happen. My dealer warned me in no uncertain terms that if I put on a programmer and break something in my motor\drivetrain I'll be on the hook to prove that the programmer didn't do it as they will void the entire engine and powertrain warranty.

Don't have a warranty? Go for it as I've heard the 5.4L responds fantastic to it due to Fords very conservative factory programming! If on the other hand you have a 4.6L in yours don't bother wasting the cash as she's pretty much at the wall unless your going to go old school with hardware and not software upgrades.


It's the other way around. The dealer has to prove that the mods caused the whatever went wrong with the drive train. If you have a programmer, just put the truck back to stock and take it off before taking it in for service.


Posted By: shum02 on 10/26/09 11:49am

schwartzworld wrote:

shum02 wrote:

cardrb wrote:


I would recommend anyone using an F150 to get an intake system and programmer for their truck.


I got a warranty so that won't happen. My dealer warned me in no uncertain terms that if I put on a programmer and break something in my motor\drivetrain I'll be on the hook to prove that the programmer didn't do it as they will void the entire engine and powertrain warranty.

Don't have a warranty? Go for it as I've heard the 5.4L responds fantastic to it due to Fords very conservative factory programming! If on the other hand you have a 4.6L in yours don't bother wasting the cash as she's pretty much at the wall unless your going to go old school with hardware and not software upgrades.


It's the other way around. The dealer has to prove that the mods caused the whatever went wrong with the drive train. If you have a programmer, just put the truck back to stock and take it off before taking it in for service.


Not up here it ain't, besides I don't have enough spare cash sitting around to hire a lawyer to justify a $500 programmer didn't dust my engine and I don't know many that do not to mention the time. But then again that's another topic I don't need more ponies under the hood really anyway, I just NEED a bigger truck


Posted By: Pyrate Dave on 10/26/09 11:52am

The newer F-150's can definitely handle heavier loads.

Last season I towed our 2008 Jayflight 26BH with a a 2002 F-150 Supercab 4X4. The truck had the 5.4 V8, and factory tow package, but came equipped with 3.31 in the differentials. This set-up gave the rig a 7000lbs max tow rating. I added a K&N CAI, Flowmaster cat-back exhaust, and a Hypertech Power Programmer III (I tuned the engine to the 93 octane program). The truck pulled ok, but I could definitely feel the TT was back there, especially when starting off from a light, merging onto the highway and keeping up with the 65mph speed limit.

On a couple of trips, we (wife, son and I) followed my friend and his wife. They have a 2010 Jayflight 22FB and tow it with an 06 F-150 supercab 4X4 with the 5.4 V8, and 3.55's in the diff's. My friend's rig is bone stock and pulled their TT effortlessly. Dry weight on the 22FB is 4120 vs. 4585 on my 26bh. The newer 3 valve 5.4 engine produces more hp and torque than the 02, and the gears made a difference.

I just recently traded in the 02 on a 2010 F-150 Supercrew with the 5.4 engine, 3.55's in the diffs, 6-speed tranny and tow package. This rig is rated to tow 9600 lbs; can't wait to hook up to the TT and see how much easier it is to tow.


Posted By: Sir Buffalo on 10/26/09 12:35pm

Pyrate Dave wrote:

The newer F-150's can definitely handle heavier loads.

Last season I towed our 2008 Jayflight 26BH with a a 2002 F-150 Supercab 4X4. The truck had the 5.4 V8, and factory tow package, but came equipped with 3.31 in the differentials. This set-up gave the rig a 7000lbs max tow rating. I added a K&N CAI, Flowmaster cat-back exhaust, and a Hypertech Power Programmer III (I tuned the engine to the 93 octane program). The truck pulled ok, but I could definitely feel the TT was back there, especially when starting off from a light, merging onto the highway and keeping up with the 65mph speed limit.

On a couple of trips, we (wife, son and I) followed my friend and his wife. They have a 2010 Jayflight 22FB and tow it with an 06 F-150 supercab 4X4 with the 5.4 V8, and 3.55's in the diff's. My friend's rig is bone stock and pulled their TT effortlessly. Dry weight on the 22FB is 4120 vs. 4585 on my 26bh. The newer 3 valve 5.4 engine produces more hp and torque than the 02, and the gears made a difference.

I just recently traded in the 02 on a 2010 F-150 Supercrew with the 5.4 engine, 3.55's in the diffs, 6-speed tranny and tow package. This rig is rated to tow 9600 lbs; can't wait to hook up to the TT and see how much easier it is to tow.


well said......pretty much explains what many of us have been saying...and I agree. Todays f150 is simply just bigger and better.

The same goes for the dodge, chevy and yes even the Toy and Nissan. Add a few goodys and your even a bit better.


Posted By: Kampfirekid on 10/27/09 11:19am

Heck, I'll bite.

I had a 2008 F-150 Supercrew with the 5.4L, 3.73 L/S, 6-1/2 foot box, 4X4, tweaked, custom tunes, MBRP dual exhaust, and AF1 intake (3-1/2"). It towed my late, late Jayco 26L with no issues, but it was a shock after being a diesel F-250 driver for 10 years. I learned what to expect, and actually didn't mind the tow. Then, we upgraded to our late 7,000# Heartland, and although the wide track axle setup was a towing dream, the advertised tongue weight over doubled when loaded. Our payload was maxed out by several hundred pounds by the time we left for the campground. The truck towed fine, but it took blocks over blocks to get on the on-ramp compared to the feet with the diesel I was used to. Still, very doable on the interstate in the Midwest, and I never dropped below 60mph with cruise on AND in overdrive. Ocassionally, I would lock out O/D before I hit a hill, but the payload sunk my ship... bad. I upgraded to an F-350 when I couldn't find an F-250... again, a smoker (6.4L). No contest there.

Now, we dumped the Heartland, and are in a small K-Z that fits our bill just fine. All of our long travels to campgrounds across the states are gone for several reasons, so we typically stay within 500 miles of home. A few 1,000 mile trips (one way) are probably in order, but we probably take 10-12 trips each summer within a 400 mile radius of home. I am now thinking or moving to a new 2010 F-150 Screw... again. I drive 50,000 miles a year, and certainly don't need the Super Duty. The diesel is great, but the turbo lag, ride, and fuel economy stink. I have weight and researched the payloads of the new 2010 Max Tow equipped F-150's to death. I may be within 100 pounds of the payload with a new F-150, but for the average of 45,000 miles of me driving empty with no load, I can't see the need for an F-350. Money really isn't the issue as I drive a company vehicle, but any place I can shave money off for my boss for the kind gestures he provides me, is some place I'll take a jump to. I am close to ordering a new F-150 shortly to consider while I think it over some more. The new Lariat Screws loaded push about 1570 in payload, where my 2008 only had 1280. ALready, I should be fine.


2013 Ford 350 Superduty Lariat. 6.7L Stock. Loaded.
2011 Jayco Flight G2 32BHDS


Print  |  Close