Woodalls Open Roads Forum: Full-time RVing: life in a rv park
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Full-time RVing

Open Roads Forum  >  Full-time RVing

 > life in a rv park

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 6  
Prev  |  Next
CSG

ID

Senior Member

Joined: 03/02/2001

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/27/10 09:55am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I see the OP is long gone...

FWIW, having owned a truck camper, two fivers, and a B, I could easily fulltime in a proper B (unlike my Traverse). Something like a Pleasureway Excel, RT 210, or any of the Sprinter conversions would work just fine for someone who didn't feel they needed to fill every square inch with******to haul around. Once you start adding people or dogs the scenario changes. But for one? A nice B is dang near perfect and far more flexible that any other rig save for, maybe a truck camper.


2001 GMC EC 2500HD, 4x4, 6.0 V8
2007 Nash 27-5B 5th Wheel
2002 Pleasure-Way Traverse
2002 Lexus Land Cruiser (LX470)

Mont G&J

Missoula, MT

Senior Member

Joined: 09/29/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/27/10 09:59am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

IMO, I believe the OP would be much happier with a small car, rent or buy a mobile home, and live in a Trailer Park.

To me, living full time in a Class B, in an RV Park would be a nightmare. Jack





bigdogger

Texas

Senior Member

Joined: 02/03/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/27/10 01:59pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dogcomestoo wrote:

bigdogger,
I'm starting to wonder if you sell real estate for a living. These days many people's homes are worth less than what they paid for them and/or they just plain can't sell them when they want to move into a smaller home or somewhere else when they retire.
As to a class B depreciating faster if you drive it daily, of course it does. But you don't have the expense of a car! So if you keep your class B for 20 years ( and many Bs on the road are older than that) and you might have bought a car every 5 years- that's the price of 4 cars you've saved. And the interest on a loan to buy an RV is tax deductible. And your living expenses- insurance on your home, heat, electric etc. are all lower. And living in a B doesn't have to be a transient lifestyle, depending on where you live you could have a year round campsite and only travel in the B for vacations. Depending on the climate where you are, you might have to put extra insulation on the water tanks, but it could be done.
I'm not saying it would be perfect, but neither is having a stick home these days. Things just aren't as black and white as you paint them.
Don't sell real estate, actually ran consumer lending for a large national bank. I have extensive experience with personal finance and understand the power of property ownership versus ownership of depreciating property. Yes, many people are upside down on their homes, but they either bought them at the peak of a bubble (that last 4 or 5 years) or they used them like a piggy bank and kept borrowing against the equity until the equity was gone. Long term ownership of property has always been a financial winner and long term ownership of depreciating property has always been a loser. As I previously stated, for a very small percentage of people in a unique position living in a Class B full time could be a wise move. For the vast majority of people, it is financially stupid. They are great for taking vacations, they may be great to full time in if you are retired. They might even work as your home and only vehicle. But for the OP to jump into a B without any previous RV experience or any apparent need to have mobile housing other than a preception that it would be cheaper than conventional housing is taking a big financial risk without a lot of apparent reward.

WTTCS

freedom , U.S.A.

Senior Member

Joined: 07/28/2003

View Profile



Posted: 07/27/10 03:34pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The only problem with your synoposis (sp)(spell check is broke) is. .... If you sell your house and go fulltime, then one SHOULD put in the bank , each and every month, the difference of what it cost to pay for the depreciating assest vs what it would cost to pay for the appreciating asset.

If you do that, you will come out way way ahead on money, plus the interest that your money will make.

But I agree if you do not save the difference, you are looking for trouble in the later years.


1997 chev crew cab 454, 5 sp. 4.10


dogcomestoo

Massachusetts

Senior Member

Joined: 08/19/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/27/10 03:34pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not such a big risk if you buy a used one that you could resell for nearly the same amount in 6 months if it didn't work out. Actually I know of people who have resold Bs for more than they paid for them because they got a good deal in the beginning. But- enough - I think we're beating a dead horse here.

WTTCS

freedom , U.S.A.

Senior Member

Joined: 07/28/2003

View Profile



Posted: 07/27/10 10:06am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I own and use my class B and after 3 days, Im up against the wall looking for someplace to hang out. Especially when the weather is bad. It is nice, it is fun, it is handy, it has everything EXCEPT SPACE. But I love it for short trips.

Merc40

Florida

New Member

Joined: 06/10/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/27/10 07:32pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ins and outs from people with experience on this subject.

Cheap RV Living

Interesting take on van living.

Falia Photography

tsetsaf

Full-Timer

Senior Member

Joined: 10/28/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/28/10 09:01pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

aquakitty wrote:

cabanaman wrote:

john and terry wrote:

Gruffy wrote:



Expect to be the youngest person in the park.


Uhhhh...not necessarily so...I am 41 and am the 2nd eldest person (full timing and not including my wife) at the park I'm at.

More and more younger folks are getting into full time RVing these days. Expect to see all sorts and ages!!
That's a bit disconcerting.


Why would you find this disconcerting? Thats kind of ageist. I am 31 and live in an RV full time. I run an online business. I absolutely hate staying on one place for long.. so month to month parks are great for me.


32 and 26 and like aquakitty my business is completely digital. Don't assume that full-timers of our age are doing this because we have to. It does not make sense to live static anymore. Pick up the book "The Four Hour Work Week" it will change your perspective.


'06 Dodge 3500 5.9L CTD 6spd Manual SB SRW - Pullrite SG - Ride Rite Airbags - Rickson 19.5 Steelies 150K and going strong
2014 Premier Elite 44' Fifth Wheel... calm down it is within the weight limits of my truck.
RV Park and Campground Directory

mr. ed

Madison, SD (but usually elsewhere)

Senior Member

Joined: 02/06/2002

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/29/10 03:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As a fulltimer, I always stay by the month since the actual cost is much less than paying daily or weekly rates. Before traveling to an area I get on the internet and locate reviews of the parks I'm considering. These aren't foolproof but do give some indication as to what to expect. I also try to find out if there are any noise factors to consider (RR tracks, nearby traffic, etc.).

In actuality, choosing an RV park can be a gamble since you don't really know your neighbors until you're there for a while. Occasionally you will get an undesirable neighbor and there may not be much you can do about it. OTOH, you may have wonderful neighbors but they can move on to be replaced by someone less than wonderful. An RV park is often in a constant state of flux. The majority of RVers are good people and don't present any problems but you will come across a rare exception on occasion. I recently had problems with a neighbor's barking dog but the management left a note on their camper and the problem ceased (they moved on a few days later).

RV park rates vary widely. I've been in some very acceptable parks that charge only $200-250/month. I'm paying $400/month at a park right now which isn't really worth the price (although electric is included). I've seen other parks (usually labeled "resorts") that charge substantially more ($600-800/month +). To me, they're not worth it since I don't normally use the amenities included in the price.

In summation, I wouldn't exchange the RV lifestyle for a more sedate existence. You will occasionally find yourself in a somewhat less than perfect situation as you fulltime (same as living a "regular" lifestyle) but the challenges are worth it, IMHO.


Mr. Ed (fulltiming since 1987)

2007 Hitchhiker II LS Model 29.5 LKTG
2007 Dodge Ram 3500/6.7 CTD/QC/4X4/SB/SRW/6-speed man/Big Horn edition


RoadXYZ

OR-WA-ID-CA

Senior Member

Joined: 08/09/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/30/10 12:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Life in an RV Park .. umm, let's see after touring America from the West Coast to the East Coast and into Canada as well as Florida these past 22 months that is a hard question.

We have stayed in some where one could shake hands with your neighbor from the window and others which were 15 ft apart .. some KOA, NPS campgrounds, chain resorts, private "ma & pa" rv parks and some volunteer sites. There is nothing typical in campground/rv parks across America.

Most of the ones we loved included being in the country (like here at Mt. Gate RV Park, north of Redding, CA) or outside Santa Fe or Flagstaff.

Having said that we will say: have definetly narrowed down what type of rv park/campground we want to be in and for that I am grateful for the chance to have done the 22-month tour of America. We found we like parks which accept mail for registered guests, have social activities, sites are combination grass/concrete pads, rules are enforced in a friendly way, and are located in countryside away from "planes, trains, and interstates, yet near enough to shopping malls to be able to do a spur of the moment grocery run. The area should have year-round activities to participate in like fishing, walking trails, theatres, churches, etc.

Ask us in another year and we may have changed our minds again and probably will still prefer to stay in "family" rv parks/campgrounds rather than adults only (we have stayed in those) even though we are in our 70s we enjoy watching children play in the pools, ride bicylces or skip rope, etc.


Full-Time RV'rs - Grandma, Grandpa, & Petunia, 9 yr old Chi
2008 Suburban / Alpenlite Travel Trailer

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 6  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Full-time RVing

 > life in a rv park
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Full-time RVing


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 Woodalls | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS