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Topic: ez lube wheels on keystone

Posted By: rtaylor0830 on 02/13/12 06:08pm

Do you use the ez lube feature and if so how do you do it to make sure you are not putting to much grease, and does this take away having to repack the bearings as often.


Posted By: Howaboutnow on 02/13/12 06:14pm

I have been putting 1 to 2 greese gun pumps into the EZ Lube bearing once a year for 6 years. Last year I became concerned about how well that was working. Had the hubs pulled and the bearings hand packed. The shop told me everything was fine and the bearings were not worn. Have about 25,000 miles on the 5th wheel. It seems to work for my situation.


Posted By: jjj on 02/13/12 06:54pm

I took mine off and replaced with a regular cap to get rid of the zert fittings that show. I never used mine and did not trust them. I just check and repack each year to keep an eye on things.


2002 F-350 Crew-Cab Dually
V-10-4.30 gears Mag-Hytec diff.cover
w/Amsoil-6.0 trans cooler Curt Q5 20K hitch & bedsaver
2005 Keystone Challenger 34TBH-Fifth Airbourn



Posted By: azjeffh on 02/13/12 06:28pm

rtaylor0830 wrote:

Do you use the ez lube feature....

After more than 7 years, the answer is No for me. I would rather have them checked than blindly putting grease in.

Others have used it with success.


Jeff
Wonderful wife Robin
05 F250 Supercab PSD w/Tow Command
05 HR Savoy 29RKS


Posted By: jmtandem on 02/13/12 06:54pm

I have used EZ lube and it takes quite a bit of grease to get it to come back out the exit area. I would think that every 5-6000 miles it might not hurt to actually repack the bearings. Even using EZ lube check check the 'play' in the bearings to be sure you are OK. Use the recommended grease to not mix greases that might not be compatible. It is really very easy to grease with EZ lube.


'05 Dodge Cummins 4x4 dually 3500 white quadcab auto long bed.
'09 299bhs Tango.


Posted By: SailingOn on 02/13/12 06:51pm

Dexter, manufacturer of the EZ Lube axles, intended the feature to prevent water intrusion when boat trailers are immersed in water in the launch process. Otherwise, pumping grease into the axle serves no purpose but probably does no harm. Turn the wheel as you add grease; use a manual grease gun, not the powered versions; use the correct grease. See www.dexter.com.


Buck: 2004 Wilderness Yukon 8275S
AJ: 2010 F150 ExtCab, 2WD, 6.5' bed, 5.4L V8, 6A, Max Tow: 2030# payload.



Posted By: Bachus on 02/13/12 06:59pm

I use mine (although my Cougar has Alko axles, and their version of the EZ lube). I'm always amazed at how much grease you have to pump in. Typically about 50 pumps per wheel with a manual grease gun. However, I have had no problems, and manually check the bearings every other year. Where does all that grease go??


Dean and Tracy Bachellier
Isobel,Evelyn, and Stuart
2012 KZ Durango D355BHS quad bunk with 5 slides
HiJacker 16K double pivot slider
2011 RAM 3500 SRW Crew Cab 4X4 CTD
"It's five o'clock somewhere...."



Posted By: BB_TX on 02/13/12 07:36pm

I used it on mine. Jacked one wheel at a time. Pumped grease with a hand pump slowly as I kept the wheel turning constantly while I was pumping. The new grease I was using was red (Mystic JT-6 Hi Temp grease, one of the ones recommended by Dexter), the old grease was a dark grey. I pumped until I saw red grease come out the front indicating that the new grease had pushed the old grease out.
It did take a lot of grease. About 3 tubes as I remember it, about yr and a half ago.
Dexter instructions


Posted By: BB_TX on 02/13/12 08:36pm

I got the Mystic at Autozone.


Posted By: fla-gypsy on 02/13/12 07:19pm

Find info here;

http://www.dexteraxle.com/faq_s


This member is not responsible for opinions that are inaccurate due to faulty information provided by the original poster. Use them at your own discretion.

09 SuperDuty Crew Cab 6.8L/4.10(The Black Pearl)
06 Keystone Hornet 29 RLS/(The Cracker Cabana)


Posted By: old guy on 02/13/12 08:19pm

where do you get the grease for these bearing?


Posted By: Allworth on 02/13/12 07:45pm

I do mine about every 5,000-6,000 miles. Turning the wheel per Dexter's instructions.

It took a lot of grease the first time; not so much on subsequent applications.


Formerly posting as "littleblackdog"
Martha, Allen, & Blackjack
2006 Chevy 3500 D/A LB SRW, RVND 7710
2008 Titanium 30E35SA; EZ-Lube axles; wet bolts; spring hanger gussetts; BFG Commercial TAs
"Real Trucks Don't Have Sparkplugs"



Posted By: Jetstreamer on 02/13/12 08:27pm

Bachus wrote:

I use mine (although my Cougar has Alko axles, and their version of the EZ lube). I'm always amazed at how much grease you have to pump in. Typically about 50 pumps per wheel with a manual grease gun. However, I have had no problems, and manually check the bearings every other year. Where does all that grease go??


On your brake pads! LOL


Posted By: ExRocketScientist on 02/14/12 05:07am

BB_TX wrote:

I used it on mine. Jacked one wheel at a time. Pumped grease with a hand pump slowly as I kept the wheel turning constantly while I was pumping. The new grease I was using was red (Mystic JT-6 Hi Temp grease, one of the ones recommended by Dexter), the old grease was a dark grey. I pumped until I saw red grease come out the front indicating that the new grease had pushed the old grease out.
It did take a lot of grease. About 3 tubes as I remember it, about yr and a half ago.
Dexter instructions

This is what I do. Reason being I don't put a lot of miles on my trailer, so like the tires, it is more of an age issue than a mileage issue. But there are two things mentioned above that need emphasis:

1. Pump SLOWLY.
2. Keep the wheel turning while you do this.

And I will add one more . . . don't do it on a cold day.

The reason for these three things is so the grease will flow from the back bearing to the front bearings and all through the bearings instead of just blowing out the grease seal in the back and getting all over the brake shoes.


ERS


Posted By: Gunpilot77 on 02/14/12 11:43am

BB_TX wrote:

I used it on mine. Jacked one wheel at a time. Pumped grease with a hand pump slowly as I kept the wheel turning constantly while I was pumping. The new grease I was using was red (Mystic JT-6 Hi Temp grease, one of the ones recommended by Dexter), the old grease was a dark grey. I pumped until I saw red grease come out the front indicating that the new grease had pushed the old grease out.
It did take a lot of grease. About 3 tubes as I remember it, about yr and a half ago.
Dexter instructions


Those Dexter instructions do not include the most important steps. Prior to pumping in the grease, using your x-ray vision, inspect all the brake componants for wear and breakage. After pumping the grease, again using you x-ray vision, inspect the inner seal for failure and/or grease bypassing it.


Fifth wheel pulled with a pick-up


Posted By: wandering1 on 02/14/12 02:19pm

Bachus wrote:

I use mine (although my Cougar has Alko axles, and their version of the EZ lube). I'm always amazed at how much grease you have to pump in. Typically about 50 pumps per wheel with a manual grease gun. However, I have had no problems, and manually check the bearings every other year. Where does all that grease go??



Mine went into the wheels and coated the brake shoes. I had to have the brake shoes replaced and was told by the dealer not to pump grease into the hubs instead of taking the hub off and repacking the bearings manually.


HR



Posted By: Rvpapa on 02/14/12 12:04pm

Why not do it the experts way properly?

http://www.timken.com/en-us/products/lubrication/technical/Pages/info.aspx

Art.


Posted By: katfish on 02/15/12 04:38pm

Vulcaneer wrote:

The grease in the hub between the bearings does absolutely no good for anything. Greasing the bearings takes very little grease, really.

I hand pack the bearings. That way I know the bearings are getting the correct amount of lube. And that lube is getting to exactly the right place where it needs to be. And when doing that I can inspect the critical parts like, drums, magnets, brakes, wires, bearings, seals, lug studs and nuts, and torque.

Pumping in grease blindly, has little or no benefit. Most of it goes into the empty cavity.


So true


"Every day is a adventure and every trip is a voyage of Discovery"
Steve & Cathy
U.S. Coast Guard (retired)
2012 KZ StoneRidge 36ul
2004 Dodge 3500 (Diesel DRW)
Advanced Air Rider hitch


Posted By: BB_TX on 02/15/12 11:28am

up2nogood wrote:

............
Yes, the key to these ez-lube wheels is doing it right, but when we get replies like 50 pumps or three tubes of grease, it is pretty obvious things are not being done right. There is only one fool proof way to insure the bearings have grease is to remove, and pack them by hand, and inspect them.

When you look at a cross section view of the EZ Lube hub, you will see there is quite a large void inside the hub to fill with grease. And yes it does take quite a large amount of grease pumped in to fill that void and push the old grease out.
It did take nearly 3 tubes of grease for my 4 wheels. And the brakes on all wheels still work fine after a year and a half. I test them each time before I get ready to go out by manually actuating the brake controller. The trailer brakes bring the truck and trailer to an abrupt stop. A year after greasing the hubs, I even raised each wheel individually and tested each brake by pulling the breakaway switch. Each wheel locked up with a quarter turn.
So do not tell me I did not do it correctly. You obviously have no clue as whether I did it right or not.
And for those who only do a pump or two, look at the cross section view. You will see that a pump or two will not get grease to the outer bearing. If you are not comfortable with pumping a lot of grease in, then you should take it apart and hand pack.


Posted By: RAS43 on 02/14/12 09:01am

Dave H M wrote:

got something for you one or two pump guys to think about. My EZ lubes came from the factory without the center part of the hub filled with grease.

so when you give it a pump or two you are just putting a little on the inner bearing.

your outer ones run pretty good without "annual" packing eh?


No matter how one lubes the bearings the grease will level out inside the hub due to centrifical force when the trailer is towed. And I am one of the old fashioned manual lubing guys even with EZ Lube hubs because even when using all of the precautions over time grease got on the brakes.


Posted By: Dave H M on 02/14/12 05:38am

got something for you one or two pump guys to think about. My EZ lubes came from the factory without the center part of the hub filled with grease.

so when you give it a pump or two you are just putting a little on the inner bearing.

your outer ones run pretty good without "annual" packing eh?


Posted By: Allworth on 02/14/12 01:46pm

On your next trailer, specify disk brakes. You will never go back.

P.S. Clean the rubber spatula with WD-40. It will keep your vocal cords from rusting.


Posted By: Vulcaneer on 02/15/12 01:32pm

The grease in the hub between the bearings does absolutely no good for anything. Greasing the bearings takes very little grease, really.

I hand pack the bearings. That way I know the bearings are getting the correct amount of lube. And that lube is getting to exactly the right place where it needs to be. And when doing that I can inspect the critical parts like, drums, magnets, brakes, wires, bearings, seals, lug studs and nuts, and torque.

Pumping in grease blindly, has little or no benefit. Most of it goes into the empty cavity.


'12 F350 SB, CC, SRW, 6.7 PSD, 3.55 RAR, 6 spd auto
2011 Open Range 393RLS 14,250 GVWR
Pullrite Super Glide 18K

Retirement = It's all poops and giggles....UNTIL you Giggle and Poop.



Posted By: up2nogood on 02/15/12 08:48am

ExRocketScientist wrote:

mguay wrote:

ExRocketScientist wrote:

Jetstreamer wrote:

Bachus wrote:

I use mine (although my Cougar has Alko axles, and their version of the EZ lube). I'm always amazed at how much grease you have to pump in. Typically about 50 pumps per wheel with a manual grease gun. However, I have had no problems, and manually check the bearings every other year. Where does all that grease go??


On your brake pads! LOL

Actually, if you do it right, it is going in the space inside the hub between the rear and front bearings. Every other year when I take things apart, I lay the drum down over top of a paper towel. Then I go down inside with a rubber spatula and work my way around the inside of the hub. This results in a huge glob of old grease dropping on the paper towel.

The technique works great. But since I developed that technique, we seem to have developed another issue. Every time my wife bakes cookies or cakes, they come out with a sort of petroleum taste to them. Any ideas?

As per Dexter. My 6k EZ Lube axle design is like this and they know there is a problem. The grease actually is pumped into the cavity between the rear bearing and the seal. The thought is that the new grease will be pumped through the rear bearing, the hub and then out through the front bearing. If the orfice was drilled in between the bearings then the inner bearing would be less likely to get fresh grease.
Their instructions state to jack the wheel up and while spinning it slowly pump the grease until clean grease emerges from the outer bearing.
I did mine as per their instructions at 5k and the next trip out i couldn't stop. A call to dexter and complete new backing plates as well as seals were on their way.
The weak link is the seal! It's rubber and flexible! When any pressure is applied to it.....it fails!

My lesson learned. Grease fittings on axles belong on boat trailers where you want to pump the water out after it was emerged. Even in that case if the seals are maintained you should not have water in the hubs.

There are two different types of seals. One of them is called a double lip seal. With these, it is possible to use the feature when done right. I know first hand because I have been doing it now for 8 years.

If it couldn't be made to work, Dexter and the other manufacturers that have similar systems would have dropped them by now.



Yes, the key to these ez-lube wheels is doing it right, but when we get replies like 50 pumps or three tubes of grease, it is pretty obvious things are not being done right. There is only one fool proof way to insure the bearings have grease is to remove, and pack them by hand, and inspect them.


Posted By: up2nogood on 02/14/12 10:33am

Well there is your answer anywhere from a couple pumps per wheel to nearly a tube per wheel or 50 pumps which ever comes first. Myself I would just forget about all that pumping, and pick a time interval that you are comfortable with, and repack the bearings by hand, and adjust the brakes when doing so. Sure takes the guess work out of how much grease to pump in there, but to each his own.


Posted By: gmcsmoke on 02/15/12 12:33pm

Funny how we have sealed wheel bearings on vehicles that last 100k+ miles but trailer bearings who may get 5k or less a year need to be inspected, x-rayed and repacked every year or catostrophic failure will insue.


Posted By: mguay on 02/14/12 05:34pm

ExRocketScientist wrote:

Jetstreamer wrote:

Bachus wrote:

I use mine (although my Cougar has Alko axles, and their version of the EZ lube). I'm always amazed at how much grease you have to pump in. Typically about 50 pumps per wheel with a manual grease gun. However, I have had no problems, and manually check the bearings every other year. Where does all that grease go??


On your brake pads! LOL

Actually, if you do it right, it is going in the space inside the hub between the rear and front bearings. Every other year when I take things apart, I lay the drum down over top of a paper towel. Then I go down inside with a rubber spatula and work my way around the inside of the hub. This results in a huge glob of old grease dropping on the paper towel.

The technique works great. But since I developed that technique, we seem to have developed another issue. Every time my wife bakes cookies or cakes, they come out with a sort of petroleum taste to them. Any ideas?

As per Dexter. My 6k EZ Lube axle design is like this and they know there is a problem. The grease actually is pumped into the cavity between the rear bearing and the seal. The thought is that the new grease will be pumped through the rear bearing, the hub and then out through the front bearing. If the orfice was drilled in between the bearings then the inner bearing would be less likely to get fresh grease.
Their instructions state to jack the wheel up and while spinning it slowly pump the grease until clean grease emerges from the outer bearing.
I did mine as per their instructions at 5k and the next trip out i couldn't stop. A call to dexter and complete new backing plates as well as seals were on their way.
The weak link is the seal! It's rubber and flexible! When any pressure is applied to it.....it fails!

My lesson learned. Grease fittings on axles belong on boat trailers where you want to pump the water out after it was emerged. Even in that case if the seals are maintained you should not have water in the hubs.


2013 GMC 3500 HD Denali CC LB DRW MAX/ALLY
2010 Keystone Laredo 316RL



Posted By: ExRocketScientist on 02/15/12 05:01am

mguay wrote:

ExRocketScientist wrote:

Jetstreamer wrote:

Bachus wrote:

I use mine (although my Cougar has Alko axles, and their version of the EZ lube). I'm always amazed at how much grease you have to pump in. Typically about 50 pumps per wheel with a manual grease gun. However, I have had no problems, and manually check the bearings every other year. Where does all that grease go??


On your brake pads! LOL

Actually, if you do it right, it is going in the space inside the hub between the rear and front bearings. Every other year when I take things apart, I lay the drum down over top of a paper towel. Then I go down inside with a rubber spatula and work my way around the inside of the hub. This results in a huge glob of old grease dropping on the paper towel.

The technique works great. But since I developed that technique, we seem to have developed another issue. Every time my wife bakes cookies or cakes, they come out with a sort of petroleum taste to them. Any ideas?

As per Dexter. My 6k EZ Lube axle design is like this and they know there is a problem. The grease actually is pumped into the cavity between the rear bearing and the seal. The thought is that the new grease will be pumped through the rear bearing, the hub and then out through the front bearing. If the orfice was drilled in between the bearings then the inner bearing would be less likely to get fresh grease.
Their instructions state to jack the wheel up and while spinning it slowly pump the grease until clean grease emerges from the outer bearing.
I did mine as per their instructions at 5k and the next trip out i couldn't stop. A call to dexter and complete new backing plates as well as seals were on their way.
The weak link is the seal! It's rubber and flexible! When any pressure is applied to it.....it fails!

My lesson learned. Grease fittings on axles belong on boat trailers where you want to pump the water out after it was emerged. Even in that case if the seals are maintained you should not have water in the hubs.

There are two different types of seals. One of them is called a double lip seal. With these, it is possible to use the feature when done right. I know first hand because I have been doing it now for 8 years.

If it couldn't be made to work, Dexter and the other manufacturers that have similar systems would have dropped them by now.


Posted By: ExRocketScientist on 02/14/12 05:11am

Jetstreamer wrote:

Bachus wrote:

I use mine (although my Cougar has Alko axles, and their version of the EZ lube). I'm always amazed at how much grease you have to pump in. Typically about 50 pumps per wheel with a manual grease gun. However, I have had no problems, and manually check the bearings every other year. Where does all that grease go??


On your brake pads! LOL

Actually, if you do it right, it is going in the space inside the hub between the rear and front bearings. Every other year when I take things apart, I lay the drum down over top of a paper towel. Then I go down inside with a rubber spatula and work my way around the inside of the hub. This results in a huge glob of old grease dropping on the paper towel.

The technique works great. But since I developed that technique, we seem to have developed another issue. Every time my wife bakes cookies or cakes, they come out with a sort of petroleum taste to them. Any ideas?


Posted By: ExRocketScientist on 02/14/12 04:19pm

Allworth wrote:

On your next trailer, specify disk brakes. You will never go back.

P.S. Clean the rubber spatula with WD-40. It will keep your vocal cords from rusting.

I'll have to try that WD-40 trick. I hear it is good for all sorts of things. LOL.

A question on the disk brakes. I know it is easy to inspect them. But what about the rest of the things like the bearings and lubrication. Is that basically the same as the drum brakes? Do you end up having to take the calipers apart or off periodically for routine maintenance?


Posted By: cabanaman on 02/15/12 04:52pm

Howaboutnow wrote:

I have been putting 1 to 2 greese gun pumps into the EZ Lube bearing once a year for 6 years. Last year I became concerned about how well that was working. Had the hubs pulled and the bearings hand packed. The shop told me everything was fine and the bearings were not worn. Have about 25,000 miles on the 5th wheel. It seems to work for my situation.
Me to,been putting 3 or 4 pumps a year in for 5 years.Just decided to do an inspection and they were fine.If you follow the instructions you will not overfill because the grease comes out the center of the grease cap.Then you just put the rubber plug back in,the grease cap remains full of grease.


Retired Navy
2007 Dodge Ram 2500 quad cab 6.7 cummins,6 speed auto,exhaust brake. Emissions removed.
2007 Open Road 378SA4S-5,equa-flex and morryde X factor,wet bolt kit,michelin ltx M/S 2 tires



Posted By: Vulcaneer on 02/16/12 08:47am

Well if your are going to use the EZ Lube system, you should make sure the whole hub is full of grease as mentioned. For four wheels that could take a few tubes of grease. But once the hubs are full of grease, all you need is a pump or two every year or so to keep the bearings topped up.


Posted By: up2nogood on 02/16/12 10:21am

ExRocketScientist wrote:

BB_TX wrote:

up2nogood wrote:

............
Yes, the key to these ez-lube wheels is doing it right, but when we get replies like 50 pumps or three tubes of grease, it is pretty obvious things are not being done right. There is only one fool proof way to insure the bearings have grease is to remove, and pack them by hand, and inspect them.

When you look at a cross section view of the EZ Lube hub, you will see there is quite a large void inside the hub to fill with grease. And yes it does take quite a large amount of grease pumped in to fill that void and push the old grease out.
It did take nearly 3 tubes of grease for my 4 wheels. And the brakes on all wheels still work fine after a year and a half. I test them each time before I get ready to go out by manually actuating the brake controller. The trailer brakes bring the truck and trailer to an abrupt stop. A year after greasing the hubs, I even raised each wheel individually and tested each brake by pulling the breakaway switch. Each wheel locked up with a quarter turn.
So do not tell me I did not do it correctly. You obviously have no clue as whether I did it right or not.
And for those who only do a pump or two, look at the cross section view. You will see that a pump or two will not get grease to the outer bearing. If you are not comfortable with pumping a lot of grease in, then you should take it apart and hand pack.

I agree with you 100%. You have developed the same skill in using this system as I.



Great guys, good luck with that skill you have developed, true I do not know if you did it right or not, but I do know one think if you pack them by hand there is no doubt they are done right, that was my point. Some have had success ,and some have not with this ez-lube device, seems hit ,and miss. Probably has to do with the inner seal holding all that grease in , some do, some don't. The big question is when they don't hold all that grease in then what. I too have the ez-lube , but will continue to do what I do, and know they are packed correctly.


Posted By: Jayco254 on 02/16/12 09:04am

When I first bought my trailer the first thing I did was to take the drums off and check the grease to make sure they were properly packed. Now every month I give them two shots of grease, and every two years I disassemble and check them. I've been using the Bearing Buddies on my boat like this except about every five years or so I'll take them apart instead of every two years, then I put new seals in and run them another 5yr. or so. Been doing this since 1973 and have never lost a bearing.


Tom, Kathy, Nikki, & Kelly
Pets: Lady - Texas Heeler, Dinger - Rhodesian Riidgeback Mix
2008 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer 4x4 5.4 ci 3.73 gears
2008 Dodge Ram SLT Big Horn 4x4 5.7L Hemi 3.92 gears
2007 Jayco Jayfeather EXP 254
Husky W/D, P-3



Posted By: ExRocketScientist on 02/16/12 05:30am

BB_TX wrote:

up2nogood wrote:

............
Yes, the key to these ez-lube wheels is doing it right, but when we get replies like 50 pumps or three tubes of grease, it is pretty obvious things are not being done right. There is only one fool proof way to insure the bearings have grease is to remove, and pack them by hand, and inspect them.

When you look at a cross section view of the EZ Lube hub, you will see there is quite a large void inside the hub to fill with grease. And yes it does take quite a large amount of grease pumped in to fill that void and push the old grease out.
It did take nearly 3 tubes of grease for my 4 wheels. And the brakes on all wheels still work fine after a year and a half. I test them each time before I get ready to go out by manually actuating the brake controller. The trailer brakes bring the truck and trailer to an abrupt stop. A year after greasing the hubs, I even raised each wheel individually and tested each brake by pulling the breakaway switch. Each wheel locked up with a quarter turn.
So do not tell me I did not do it correctly. You obviously have no clue as whether I did it right or not.
And for those who only do a pump or two, look at the cross section view. You will see that a pump or two will not get grease to the outer bearing. If you are not comfortable with pumping a lot of grease in, then you should take it apart and hand pack.

I agree with you 100%. You have developed the same skill in using this system as I.


Posted By: ExRocketScientist on 02/16/12 11:07am

up2nogood wrote:

ExRocketScientist wrote:

BB_TX wrote:

up2nogood wrote:

............
Yes, the key to these ez-lube wheels is doing it right, but when we get replies like 50 pumps or three tubes of grease, it is pretty obvious things are not being done right. There is only one fool proof way to insure the bearings have grease is to remove, and pack them by hand, and inspect them.

When you look at a cross section view of the EZ Lube hub, you will see there is quite a large void inside the hub to fill with grease. And yes it does take quite a large amount of grease pumped in to fill that void and push the old grease out.
It did take nearly 3 tubes of grease for my 4 wheels. And the brakes on all wheels still work fine after a year and a half. I test them each time before I get ready to go out by manually actuating the brake controller. The trailer brakes bring the truck and trailer to an abrupt stop. A year after greasing the hubs, I even raised each wheel individually and tested each brake by pulling the breakaway switch. Each wheel locked up with a quarter turn.
So do not tell me I did not do it correctly. You obviously have no clue as whether I did it right or not.
And for those who only do a pump or two, look at the cross section view. You will see that a pump or two will not get grease to the outer bearing. If you are not comfortable with pumping a lot of grease in, then you should take it apart and hand pack.

I agree with you 100%. You have developed the same skill in using this system as I.



Great guys, good luck with that skill you have developed, true I do not know if you did it right or not, but I do know one think if you pack them by hand there is no doubt they are done right, that was my point. Some have had success ,and some have not with this ez-lube device, seems hit ,and miss. Probably has to do with the inner seal holding all that grease in , some do, some don't. The big question is when they don't hold all that grease in then what. I too have the ez-lube , but will continue to do what I do, and know they are packed correctly.

You are right. Some of us are able to do it. And for those that try it and blow out the seals, it will cost them money for new seals and brake shoes, plus all of the labor to clean things up and change all of the parts, etc.


Posted By: SailingOn on 02/15/12 04:48pm

The key for me is that Dexter recommends inspecting every year or 12000 miles. You can't inspect the bearings without taking them out and cleaning them.
Using the EZ-Lube feature doesn't avoid that.
If you clean, inspect and repack them every year, and don't drive underwater, you're set.


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