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 > Can I tow ANYTHING with a 3500 lb hitch limit?

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Magblue10

Valparaiso, IN

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Posted: 05/26/12 07:03am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Im not sure but I would think you could get a class 3 hitch and then get WDH and solve some of the issues previously mentioned. There are plenty of trailers out there as several have said that you could pull. Maybe even a hybrid in the smaller sizes as well. Just do your homework and look at the possibility of the class three, its only a couple hundred bucks and if you have tow package everything else should be fine with trans cooler and such. Just keep looking and think you will get something you enjoy.

xteacher

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Posted: 05/26/12 07:14am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Whiskeyjack44 wrote:

MPSAN, I have one of the larger RPods (RP 175 2300 lb. dry and up to about 3700 lb. wet). My wife and I like it a lot. Now for the bad news. The Pods may be aerodynamic looking, but they do not tow easily. They push wind as badly as many slab sided small trailers.

There are two dedicated RPod bulletin boards, and you wouldn't believe the number of people who have tried to tow even the smallest RPods with rigs rated at 3500 lbs, and even more, and as time wore on they gave up and either dumped the Pod or bought a larger tow vehicle. I had a 4800 lb. rated Dakota that I deemed not able to tow our Pod well enough in the Pacific Northwest. It's been said before, "RVing is supposed to be fun, and if you have to sweat your towing combo, all of the fun is gone!" Be very careful. With your tow rating, you really have to make a lot of tough decisions.


I agree! We tried pulling an R-Pod (w/out a slide - the 173) with a 3500 pound capacity vehicle b/c we were told it would be a good combination - NOT a good experience. There was as much wind drag, if not more, pulling the R-Pod, than I had with a previous truck and much larger TT. If you go on the R-Pod website, there is a discussion on the wind drag problem - the drag comes from above and from below. It put too much strain on my vehicle, especially the transmission (yes, we had a transmission cooler). We didn't keep it for long. We weren't going to keep a small cramped TT that couldn't even be pulled with a small vehicle!

I recommend an Aliner, which has a low towing profile and is very light. We now have a RAV 4 six cylinder with tow package and are considering one in the future.


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wmoses

Houston, Texas, USA

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Posted: 05/26/12 07:55am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MPSAN wrote:

Hello ALL:

We had a Sprinter B that we sold as it was too small. My wife got a new 2012 Lincoln MKX and it had the towing package. It said the hitch was good for the standard 3500 lb max load that even our B would would tow. I was looking into a Forest River R-POD but in spite of what dealers say, Forest River said that they would NOT tow it with the MKX. Is there anything that we could get? At times we thought it would be OK if we just had a small 10' that had a toilet and small place to make lunch, etc. We would then just stay in a motel along the way.

Thanks all!

When all is said and done, you'd do well to focus on RVs with a maximum full loaded weight of 2800#, for a comfortable and safe towing experience. Anything bigger you will need a more capable tow vehicle.

Lincoln MKXs are not made for towing despite the hitch that may be attached, so using it for that function in the first place is pushing the limits of its design compromise.

Popups are the way to go for that vehicle. Casita also makes small RVs that may be doable, and are pleasing to the eye of some.


Regards,
Wayne
2014 Flagstaff Super Lite 27RLWS Emerald Ed. | Equal-i-zer 1200/12,000 4-point WDH
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MPSAN

Portland, Oregon

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Posted: 05/26/12 04:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

WOW, I had no idea this would be a 4 page question! :-)

Anyway, the towing package on our AWD MKX does have the included sway bars and they say a WDH is NOT needed. However, I am starting to believe that an R-POD may not be for us. At any rate, perhaps we should look into a very small TT...like 10-12 feet that has a toilet and place to make a small lunch. Then we can just stay in a motel, etc. Lots to look at! What makes it hard is that for everyone who says "Go for it" there are also those who say that 3,500 lb class II is too small for the R-PODS...any of them! I am surprised, however, that the dealer says he does this all the time and has never had a customer have an issue. I must admit that I would wonder how the MKX/R-POD would work when an 18 wheeler passed! Also, a popup is OK, but It sure would be an issue to pull over and use the "Rest Room" in it.

I sure can not thank all of you enough for your information and suggestion(s)!

* This post was edited 05/26/12 05:05pm by MPSAN *


"If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is"


Gdetrailer

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Posted: 05/26/12 04:52pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jetta03 writes "I believe your MKX with the tow package has transmission cooler, ford's electronic sway control and over 300hp. I see no reason at all why you can't pull an r-pod with it, I would think this is a very good match as long as you don't go crazy loading it up."

You can have a thousand HP under the hood and it may still not tow well. There is much more other dynamics to towing than just HP.

The body, suspension, transmission, axles, tires must be substantial enough to handle the weight of the trailer behind it.

Vehicles like this have a mighty fine soft ride, this often does not translate into a good towing experience. While it may be do able it, it may not be comfortable and fun and could be downright dangerous in the wrong conditions.

It is about the vehicle controlling the trailer load, not the trailer controlling the tow vehicle. HP does nothing for controlling the trailer load.

Magblue10 writes "Im not sure but I would think you could get a class 3 hitch and then get WDH and solve some of the issues previously mentioned. There are plenty of trailers out there as several have said that you could pull."

No, no, no!

Simply adding a heavier hitch to allow for WD does not increase the tow ratings of the vehicle. You are doing a disservice to the OP and others buy suggesting this.

There is much more to tow ratings then the hitch or even HP and torque. The vehicle as a whole plays into the manufacturers tow ratings. The manufacturers KNOW a good deal more about the vehicles suspension, frame, engine, transmission than we do.

Good chance the frame and suspension of the vehicle is not up to the stresses that WD will put it under.

Iteachmiddleschool writes "We tried pulling an R-Pod (w/out a slide - the 173) with a 3500 pound capacity vehicle b/c we were told it would be a good combination - NOT a good experience."

THIS is coming from a "voice of experience", LISTEN to it!

I to towed with a vehicle which had a 3500 lb tow rating, I towed a open bed utility trailer. That trailer empty weighed about 600 lbs. It was a ruff ride, the trailer BOUNCED the car all over the road (even empty), it was neither fun or safe to do so but it was all I had at the time.

I would never consider towing that combination any real distances nor at highway speeds (55 and under), just local towing.

When I bought my first truck and towed the trailer with that truck, it was a night and day difference. The truck commanded that trailer. This is one of those things that you won't understand unless you have had the same experience.

My suggestion, sadly is to say that you are much better off forgetting about towing a hard sided trailer. A popup would get you within your tow ratings but only if you buy the lightest one AND pack extremely light.

I would second the idea if you could find a used 1/2 ton pickup (or a bigger SUV) then you will open yourself up to trailers in the size you are wanting.

I waited many years until I was able to buy a truck capable of towing a travel trailer of any substantial size. I am glad I waited!

I have as of yet seen anyone post that they bought too big of a tow vehicle but I have seen lots of folks complain of not having enough tow vehicle.

MPSAN

Portland, Oregon

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Posted: 05/26/12 05:13pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you for your great post, Gdetrailer. In spite of what the dealer says, I am surprised at the posts that say that they did do what I wanted and were NOT happy! That, to me, says a lot. I have a lot to think about, but wonder if there are any very small 10-12 foot units that we can use going to a Motel destination and just give up on CG's. Just something with a toilet and something to keep a few things cool.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 05/26/12 06:15pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MPSAN, unless you are way out in no where I wouldn't worry about toilets. I traveled for quite a few years in a car and stayed at Hotels. Found lots of places to stop for potty breaks.

For keeping things cool, I used a cooler with a lot of ice, nothing like having ice cold milk!

A great way to manage the ice is to make large ice blocks, I found pint and quart size blocks will stay at least for three days!

I simply fill a few pint or quart containers and place them in my home freezer a few days to a week ahead (don't fill completely full if you do they will split the containers).

I simply run some warm water over the container and the ice will drop right out of the container (same idea as the old fashioned aluminum ice cube trays from the '50s).

I do sometimes miss the days of not having a tender (trailer) behind my vehicle, making quick turns or stops or site seeing with a trailer sometimes isn't easy. But I do like having my own "place" so to speak so I continue with my trailer.

BC Nomad

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Posted: 05/26/12 08:40pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is a nice compact Cabin-A3 Expedition, self contained, hard sided unit. You can get more pictures with a Google search on the model.Check this one out.


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MPSAN

Portland, Oregon

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Posted: 05/26/12 09:04pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BC Nomad wrote:

Here is a nice compact Cabin-A3 Expedition, self contained, hard sided unit. You can get more pictures with a Google search on the model.Check this one out.


...but from what I can see they are no longer made...at least I can not find it.

jerem0621

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Posted: 05/26/12 09:42pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Scamp 13, Casita 13, or an old U-haul fiberglass egg would serve you well.
It's all about matching the combo up correctly.

Believe it or not, aerodynamics play huge factors on the ability to punch a hole in the air. Which is what towing a travel trailer actually does. Flat nose, flat rear, or odd shapes (R-pod????) all affect how well a trailer tows.

Something that I feel needs to be addressed is receiver hitch flex. Class 2 and glorified Class 2 hitches mistakenly referred to as a class III by the casual observer ( because of the 2 inch opening) will flex as the trailer tongue weight approaches the max trailer tongue weight.

Watch some of the combos driving down the road you will notice some of the lighter weight vehicles look like the shank is not level bit is pointing down. As the combo flexes going down the road the receiver will flex some. Of the receiver flexes then the combo will feel loose and the experience will be negative.

If possible, replace the hitch with a true class 3 hitch rated for WD if available.

Go for a lightweight fiberglass egg or small pup, aliner. Even something small like a Jayco swift may be doable with the right equipment. Possibly even a Trailmannor.

Thanks

Jeremiah


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