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 > Advantages of a manual transmission

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dannydimitt

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Posted: 04/12/13 07:46pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Engine braking

In contrast to most manual gearboxes, most automatic transmissions have far less effective engine braking. This means that the engine does not slow the car as effectively when the automatic transmission driver releases the engine speed control. This leads to more usage of the brakes in anything with automatic transmissions, bringing shorter brake life. Brakes are also more likely to overheat in hilly or mountainous areas, causing reduced braking ability brake fade and the potential for complete failure with the automatic transmission vehicle.

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dannydimitt

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Posted: 04/12/13 07:49pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Longevity and cost

Because manual transmissions are mechanically simpler, are more easily manufactured, and have fewer moving parts than automatic transmissions, they require less maintenance and are easier as well as cheaper to repair. Due to their mechanical simplicity, they often last longer than automatic transmissions when used by a skilled driver. Typically, there are no electrical components, pumps and cooling mechanisms (in the manual transmission), other than an internal switch to activate reversing lighting. The price of a new vehicle with a manual transmission will commonly be lower than the same vehicle with an automatic transmission. Clutches are a wear item which may need to be replaced at some point in the vehicle's lifespan, however the service life of the clutch depends on the skill of the driver.





RCMAN46

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Posted: 04/12/13 07:53pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dannydimitt wrote:

Engine braking

In contrast to most manual gearboxes, most automatic transmissions have far less effective engine braking. This means that the engine does not slow the car as effectively when the automatic transmission driver releases the engine speed control. This leads to more usage of the brakes in anything with automatic transmissions, bringing shorter brake life. Brakes are also more likely to overheat in hilly or mountainous areas, causing reduced braking ability brake fade and the potential for complete failure with the automatic transmission vehicle.

With the newer automatics such as the Allison this is not true.

PAThwacker

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Posted: 04/12/13 07:54pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I drove Several manual jeep tj for 15 years and rarely had to perform a brake job.I never had or needed to use the brakes, or burn a clutch. The only time iI had to replace a set of rotors was after a winter sitting parked in a garage and rotting away.


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tsetsaf

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Posted: 04/12/13 07:56pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Engine braking... with a diesel your argument is false unless you have an exhaust brake. The new auto trannies pretty much negate the need for manuals.


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dannydimitt

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Posted: 04/12/13 07:56pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Performance and control

Manual transmissions generally offer a wider selection of gear ratios. Many vehicles offer a 5-speed or 6-speed manual, whereas the automatic option would typically be a 4-speed. This is generally due to the increased space available inside a manual transmission compared with an automatic, since the latter requires extra components for self-shifting, such as torque converters and pumps.A manual transmission has more space to put in more speeds.Would like to put a 13 spd Road Ranger in our Dodge.

dannydimitt

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Posted: 04/12/13 08:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Today's truck transmissions are most commonly "range-splitter". The most common 13-speed has a standard H pattern, and the pattern from left upper corner is as follows: R, down to L, over and up to 1, down to 2, up and over to 3, down to 4. The "butterfly" range lever in the center front of the knob is flipped up to high range while in 4th, then shifted back to 1. The 1 through 4 positions of the knob are repeated. Also, each can be split using the thumb-actuated under-overdrive lever on the left side of the knob while in high range. The "thumb" lever is not available in low range, except in 18 speeds; 1 through 4 in low range can be split using the thumb lever and L can be split with the "Butterfly" lever. L cannot be split using the thumb lever in either the 13- or 18-speed. The 9-speed transmission is basically a 13-speed without the under-overdrive thumb lever.

dannydimitt

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Posted: 04/12/13 08:06pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Fuel economy

The manual transmission couples the engine to the transmission with a rigid clutch instead of the torque converter on an automatic transmission or the v-belt of a continuously variable transmission, which slip by nature. Manual transmissions also lack the parasitic power consumption of the automatic transmission's hydraulic pump. Because of this, manual transmissions generally offer better fuel economy than automatic or continuously variable transmissions; however the disparity has been somewhat offset with the introduction of locking torque converters on automatic transmissions. Increased fuel economy with a properly operated manual transmission vehicle versus an equivalent automatic transmission vehicle can range from 5% to about 15% depending on driving conditions and style of driving. The lack of control over downshifting under load in an automatic transmission, coupled with a typical vehicle engine's greater efficiency under higher load, can enable additional fuel gains from a manual transmission by allowing the operator to keep the engine performing under a more efficient load/RPM combination.

dannydimitt

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Posted: 04/12/13 08:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Longevity and cost

Because manual transmissions are mechanically simpler, are more easily manufactured, and have fewer moving parts than automatic transmissions, they require less maintenance and are easier as well as cheaper to repair. Due to their mechanical simplicity, they often last longer than automatic transmissions when used by a skilled driver. Typically, there are no electrical components, pumps and cooling mechanisms (in the manual transmission), other than an internal switch to activate reversing lighting. The price of a new truck with a manual transmission will commonly be lower than the same vehicle with an automatic transmission. Clutches are a wear item which may need to be replaced at some point in the vehicle's lifespan, however the service life of the clutch depends on the skill of the driver.

dannydimitt

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Posted: 04/12/13 08:11pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For most people, there is a slight learning curve with a manual transmission, which may be intimidating and unappealing for an inexperienced driver. Because the driver must develop a feel for properly engaging the clutch, an inexperienced driver will often stall the engine. Most drivers can learn how to drive a vehicle with a manual transmission in as little as an hour, although it may take weeks before it becomes "second nature."

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