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 > Which axle ratio for 2013 Ram 3500 dually?

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jmtandem

western nevada

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Posted: 07/21/13 03:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

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I didn't option them up but from the spec sheet, it said for 3.42, you get roughly 20k lb towing, for 3.92 (?), you get roughly 25k lb and for 4.10, you get just under 30k lb.



This is very interesting. Towing near 18,500 pounds you will be at the higher end of the 3.42 gears Ram tow rating; a definite towing 'cushion' with the 3.92 gears; and plenty of capacity using 4.10 gears. I think for something near 18,500 pounds towing I would opt for the 3.92 gears if the 3.73 are not available. That gives some extra towing capacity. Fulltiming usually requires more stuff, one estimate I saw was to plan on about 2500-3000 pounds of stuff when full timing in deference to about 1000 pounds for normal recreational weekend stuff camping. You may be closer to your GVWR for the coach then you think. The Escapees web pages might give some information on how much weight the typical full timer takes in a fifth wheel. Might be an eye opener.

As to fuel mileage, my experience with three Ram Cummins, two with 3.54 axles and the one I now own with 3.73 axles, the fuel mileage is better under 2000 rpm's, above that the engine does use fuel. It might help to look at your normal cruising speeds not towing and determine the axle ratio that would keep the tach well under 2000 rpm's for better fuel mileage if that is a concern. Most purchase the diesel for towing and the fuel mileage is a secondary, but important, consideration.

Many diesel drivers climbing a long grade will watch the tach, temps and boost more than the speedometer. And if you can keep about 20-25 percent throttle in reserve the mountain towing experience will be stress free. As 4x4Ford suggests keep the engine where you want it by using the gears. I live where the grades are long, 6 or 8 percent or more, and keeping the engine and trans in the torque makes for an easy tow up hill. So far I have never had to drop below the speed limit and can often pass others climbing while towing, a real treat! The diesel will flatten the mountains for you!

* This post was edited 07/21/13 03:20pm by jmtandem *


'05 Dodge Cummins 4x4 dually 3500 white quadcab auto long bed.
'09 299bhs Tango.

4x4ord

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Posted: 07/21/13 04:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Perrysburg Dodgeboy wrote:

You know I got to thinking, out on the highways and by-ways your going to be fine. But what about when you get off the beaten trail. Going to Top of The Caves in Logan, Ohio there is a steep grade that I had to pull the trans all the way into first gear in three sections. EGT went up, coolant temp and trans temp all went up. My BIL had to pull off to let his rig cool down. Something to think about, not all areas are flat.

There have been a few times I wish I had 4:10 gear over the 3:73 gear.

Don


Keep in mind Don that there is a big difference in the transmission gears from '04 to '13. In 04 even the HO Cummins with 4.10 gears could only deliver about 6000 lb ft of torque to the rear axle in low gear. The new Ram with 3.42 gears is capable of 11000 lb ft of torque on the rear axle in low gear. (This is not taking into account any torque management which I know nothing about/Does this torque management look for wheel spin before defueling? If it does, then wheel spin will limit the axle torque not gear ratios)


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YnotTurbo

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Posted: 07/22/13 01:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Your daily driving with the 3:42 gears will not yeild that much more fuel economy. You are still pushing 8000 lbs of truck...


Navy Chief (Ret.)Still working. 2012 Ram 3500 Laramie w/6.7 High Output, 2011 Mobile Suites Lexington
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retispcsi

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Posted: 07/22/13 03:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Previous Ram was a 5.9 48re with a 3:73. New truck 2012 6.7 68re with max tow ie. 4:10. I have pulled the same fiver over the same hills. Now this may only apply to the Ram which is the truck you are asking about. The 4:10 makes a very positive difference when pulling the hills/mountains etc. On the flats either will work. Put on the tow/haul mode, engage exhaust brake set the cruise and truck on down the road. Mine is a daily driver and no regrets about fuel useage.


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Acei

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Posted: 07/22/13 03:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So if there's almost no fuel penalty, why would anyone choose 3.73 over 4.10?

Perrysburg Dodgeboy

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Posted: 07/22/13 04:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Terry the torque management (on our older trucks) within the ECM looks at throttle position when starting from a dead stop. So if you want to launch off the line you are better off pressing only half way down and as soon as you hit 15 MPH you can go to WOT. Now that was what I was told by a power train engineer and that was back in 2006.

With all the newer vehicles now having to have stability/traction control, I'm not to sure what all it looks at now. The STC systems look at the wheel sensors along with some other inputs from other senors also. The TM was implemented to protect the drive train , transmission, torque converter, driveshaft/shafts and to a lessor extent the rear end/ends from WOT launches.

Don


Currently truck less and trailer less. Sold the 2500 Ram and ordered a 2015 Ram 1500 Laramie Crew Cab SWB 4X4 Eco-diesel. Or as I have been told on here, the slowest & weakest truck on the market

Perrysburg Dodgeboy

Perrysburg, Ohio USA

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Posted: 07/22/13 04:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Acei wrote:

So if there's almost no fuel penalty, why would anyone choose 3.73 over 4.10?


Not sure, but in like trucks 4X4 compared to 4X4 there really is not more then a 1-2 MPG difference. My 4X2 truck can hit 28 MPG routinely on the highway @ 65 MPH. Have a buddy that has the same truck but with 4WD and 4:10 gears with a gear vender overdrive unit and only sees 24 MPG driving the same area as me.

If you are looking at a 4X4 then I would think the 3:42 would be the right gear for your set up IMO. With the 4X4 if you need to back up a steep incline you can always switch the transfer case into low right? If going 2WD then I would diffidently look at a lower gear IMO.

Good luck and remember the cost to change gears later will be around 2K so it is cheaper to get them up front and will help resale also.

Don

Nautique200

Woodland WA

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Posted: 07/22/13 10:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a 2012 with 3.73s and 35" tires. This is pretty close to the 3.42 ratio. I hate it. I have a hard time getting heavy loads moving, the truck has to turn a lot of RPMs to get the load moving. Also, the torque converter does not lock up on some of the steep mountain roads we haul our horse trailer (10K) up. These roads take 20 minutes of non stop climbing doing between 15 and 35 mph. The transmission just keeps building heat. On the highway, it does great. Everywhere else, it leaves me wishing I would have chosen the 4.10s so I would have been closer to a 3.73 final ratio.

I'm looking at getting a 2014 DRW Ram with the Aisin and Air Suspension. I will be getting 3.73s or 4.10s, I would never consider the 3.42.


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4x4ord

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Posted: 07/22/13 11:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Nautique200 wrote:

I have a 2012 with 3.73s and 35" tires. This is pretty close to the 3.42 ratio. I hate it. I have a hard time getting heavy loads moving, the truck has to turn a lot of RPMs to get the load moving. Also, the torque converter does not lock up on some of the steep mountain roads we haul our horse trailer (10K) up. These roads take 20 minutes of non stop climbing doing between 15 and 35 mph. The transmission just keeps building heat. On the highway, it does great. Everywhere else, it leaves me wishing I would have chosen the 4.10s so I would have been closer to a 3.73 final ratio.

I'm looking at getting a 2014 DRW Ram with the Aisin and Air Suspension. I will be getting 3.73s or 4.10s, I would never consider the 3.42.


I am not doubting your post but I am very surprised by it because my Ford has 3.55 gears and 34" tires which makes it about 3.34 with 32" tires. It starts out with a 30,000 lb trailer as though there is nothing hooked to it. I attribute much of that to Ford's torque converter which can lock up at 900 rpm. My guess is that the Aisin set up will be much the same.

4x4ord

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Posted: 07/23/13 07:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Nautique200 wrote:

I have a 2012 with 3.73s and 35" tires. This is pretty close to the 3.42 ratio. I hate it. I have a hard time getting heavy loads moving, the truck has to turn a lot of RPMs to get the load moving. Also, the torque converter does not lock up on some of the steep mountain roads we haul our horse trailer (10K) up. These roads take 20 minutes of non stop climbing doing between 15 and 35 mph. The transmission just keeps building heat. On the highway, it does great. Everywhere else, it leaves me wishing I would have chosen the 4.10s so I would have been closer to a 3.73 final ratio.

I'm looking at getting a 2014 DRW Ram with the Aisin and Air Suspension. I will be getting 3.73s or 4.10s, I would never consider the 3.42.


Your 68rfe has a first gear ratio of 3.23:1
The Aisin has a first gear ratio of 3.74:1

In addition to the large difference in first gear ratios, I wouldn't be real surprised to hear the torque converter used behind the 800 lb ft Cummins with the 68rfe transmission was never really designed to handle all that torque.

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